Results tagged ‘ Texas Rangers ’

Gold Gloves and a Trip to Arkansas

Now that the off-season has begun and the hot stove will be burning for the next few months, I felt it necessary to talk about the two major Yankee headlines this past week–the Gold Glove Awards and the Yankees’ visit to Arkansas to speak with big time Free Agent Cliff Lee.

First…

Gold Gloves

Jeter, Teixeira, and cano took home gold this year

Three Yankee infielders took home Gold Glove Awards on Tuesday. Robinson Cano won the American League Gold Glove for second base, the first time he has ever won the award. Mark Teixeira won his fourth Gold Glove (second with New York) and then there is Derek Jeter.

Jeter won his fifth Gold Glove and all I have been hearing since he won it is how much he did not deserve it; how his range is down, how he cannot move to his left, and how many balls get through the infield holes because he cannot get to them.


No range.All true. I am not going to say Jeter is the best defensive shortstop in the A.L. because it’s not really a fact. However, numbers do not lie, and that’s why I think Jeter received the honor.

In 2010, Jeter secured a higher fielding percentage than any other shortstop in the A.L. along with committing the fewest errors (six) among any other shortstop in the league.

Honestly, I think those numbers won him the Gold Glove. It really wasn’t because he was the best fielder. However, many people have been saying that he did deserve it because everything else he does (like leading the team) makes up for his lack of range.

And, in addition to his numbers, his ability to (after all these years) utilize his patented “Jeter spinning jump throw,” which we did see at certain points this season. Case in point, May 26 in Minnesota.

Still got it?!

For me, I look at Jeter’s defense as a two-sided coin. I completely understand his critics’ arguments about his defense. Did he deserve the Gold Glove? Probably not. Were his numbers better than the rest of the shortstops in the league? Yes, but there is still no denying his range is not what it used to be. The Yankee Captain now struggles at getting to grounders he could once reach in a flash.

However…

When people criticize his defense, I tend to remember some of the better things he has done playing the field, such as:

·         His backward plunge into the third base seats, Game Five of the 2001 American League Division Series vs. Oakland at Yankee Stadium; a catch which ended an at-bat by Terrence Long

 

·         His infamous dive into the seats on July 1, 2004 at Yankee Stadium vs. the Red Sox to rob Trot Nixon of what could have been a game-changing RBI hit.

 


Flies into the stands! 

·         His famous “flip play” in the ’01 ALDS in Oakland. While out of position, Jeter flipped the ball to catcher Jorge Posada to nail Jeremy Giambi at home plate for a huge out. 

 


The flip 

The most telling aspect of these three defensive plays? The Yankees won all three of those games.

And if you ask Jeter, that’s what he cares about most: the Yankees winning. The Captain could probably care less about individual awards and accolades. Not saying he probably does not appreciate it, but every season we hear him say the same thing: “We (the Yankees) need to win the World Series. If we don’t accomplish that, it’s a failed season to us.”

Jeter cares more about the strength and the good of the team than he does himself, which is an admirable quality about him. He does not seem to pride himself on winning things by himself, but rather he takes honor in the team’s overall success.

If you were to ask Jeter, he would certainly say he would have taken another World Series ring–for he and his team–over the Gold Glove this year.

I, for one, am proud to see a player exhibit that kind of morale. Jeter is a leader who wants the best for all of his teammates and not just himself. Congrats to Jeter, Cano, and Teixeira on winning the 2010 A.L. Gold Gloves.

 

Cliff Lee

The next Yankee?

Let the bidding, the rumors, and the possible offers begin.

The Yankees reached out to big-name free agent starter Cliff Lee yesterday, paying him a visit at his home in Arkansas. According to several reports, Yankees’ GM Brian Cashman flew out to meet Lee, one of the Yankees’ top off-season priorities.

The Yankee GM is looking to land Lee

Several reporters said the meeting was informal; almost a “meet-and-greet” if you will, which is not uncommon when a team is seeking a free agent. After all, communication is always important when it comes to making deals. Just ask the Red Sox when they wanted Alex Rodriguez at the end of the 2003 season.

Lee’s agent Darek Braunecker said he probably will not make a decision until the winter meetings begin next month. Braunecker also stated that what happened during the ALCS probably will not affect Lee’s decision on where he will pitch in 2011.

To refresh your memory, Lee’s wife Kristen was apparently called names, taunted, and spat at during the ALCS at Yankee Stadium–all happening as Lee was dominating the Yankees on his way to helping the Texas Rangers claim the A.L. Championship. 

According to reports, an apology for those despicable actions may have been given to Lee’s wife when Cashman visited Lee yesterday.


Lee just might be a Yankee 

Looking at the situation right now, I feel it will come down to Texas and New York for Lee; one or the other. It will be almost a proverbial “off-season ALCS rematch,” but with the Yanks and Rangers competing for Lee instead of the A.L. title.

Lee has said that he would not mind returning to Texas in 2011, but what also has to be considered is the Yankees’ aggressiveness.

There’s no telling what kind of a deal Cashman and the front office will piece together; they sought Lee back in July and came within an eyelash of landing him in a trade, but were ultimately beat out by the Rangers. It’s no secret that the Yanks want him.

Not to mention the fact that Yankee ace CC Sabathia is good friends with Lee off the field, going back to their days on the Cleveland Indians. He could certainly play a role in deciding where Lee ends up next season.

There are many Yankee fans who want to see Lee in pinstripes. Considering how he has owned the Yankees in the past and how valuable he could be as a number two starter, of course the Yankee faithful is going to want him in pinstripes. Sabathia and Lee have the potential to be the most lethal “one-two punch” in the American League, maybe in baseball.

Yet, there are those who do not want to see it happen. Even the most die-hard Yankee loyalists are arguing that it’s not fair for the Yankees to spend the kind of outrageous money to land Lee in a signing–and in a lot of ways they have a valid point.  Lee is going to ask for a Sabathia-like deal, probably lobbying for a huge contract with a number of years and a lot of money attached to it.

Too much $$

Is it really fair for the Yankees to go out and do that? Probably not, and I say that as a die-hard Yankee fan. They already spent a quarter of a $billion on three players prior to 2009, and that got them a championship.

It’s just another reason there should be a salary cap in Major League Baseball. Payroll disparity is becoming more and more of issue as the years go by, and no, it’s not fair. Teams like the Kansas City Royals, the Oakland Athletics, the Pittsburgh Pirates, and the Seattle Mariners could only dream of signing a free agent for big money and multiple years.

However…I am all for whatever makes the Yankees World Champions in 2011. And, although it really isn’t fair, if Lee is going to help bring the title back to the Bronx, I say go for it; offer him the world and sign him.

Lee just better live up to the contract, should he get it. If he gets the big deal and they lose in 11 months…we are going to have a serious problem on our hands.

 

Right now I’d like to say some thank yous!

First off, thanks to the readers of MLBlogs for their support. Yankee Yapping was ranked no. 3 in October, surprisingly beating out a lot of the San Francisco Giant blogs, which really shocked me. I stopped blogging after the ALCS ended (call it depression, lol) yet still secured the number three spot.

No. 3!!!!!!

So thanks for that everyone!!! No. 3 is the highest I’ve been so far. (If I ever make it to no. 1 it would be a miracle; it’d be extremely difficult to knock my good friend Jane off the top. She blogs every day and certainly deserves the no. 1 spot month in and month out!)

I’d also like to thank the North County News here in New York for giving me my first writing job. Last weekend I covered the local high school football game and submitted my first article as a freelance reporter.

 I will be at it again this weekend, this time covering high school field hockey.

Yeah, I know, it’s not exactly my dream–the press box at Yankee Stadium–but it’s definitely a start.  I understand the concept of working my way up and hopefully/eventually I’ll be covering the Yankees; living out my dream and sitting in that press box with the rest of the writers.

Please check out my first article for the NCN and thanks again for all the support.

Go Yankees!!!


Thank you, Everyone!!!!! :)

Congrats To Giants, The 2010 World Series Champions

 

Everywhere you looook!

The San Francisco Giants are World Series Champions for the first time since 1954. I wonder if that means Danny Tanner, Jesse Katsopolis, and Joey Gladstone will be attending the victory parade…

I am just kidding about the second part, of course. But in all seriousness, hats off to the G-Men on a well-played 2010 World Series. They had everything go right for them; solid pitching, stellar defense, and incredible offense.

Congrats to the Giants

Last summer ESPN’s Baseball Tonight program hosted their “Chatter Up” segment, a part of the show in which viewers can submit their ideas and thoughts about a subject chosen by the panel. ESPN picks the best comments sent in, puts them on TV, and the analysts discuss them. The topic in question was, “Which team in the National League, currently not in first place, do you think has the best chance of making the postseason?”

My comment was, “I think it’s the Giants, because Tim Lincecum, Matt Cain, and Jonathan Sanchez remind me of Greg Maddux, Tom Glavine, and John Smoltz.”

As I was watching the program, to my surprise, my name and comment showed up on ESPN.

Steve Berthiaume, the panel moderator, said, “OK, I get the Greg Maddux-Tim Lincecum thing; I’m with him on Matt Cain-Tom Glavine…but I’m a little lost on John Smoltz-Jonathan Sanchez. I don’t think…But that’s OK…”

Thanks for featuring me ESPN. Told you the Giants were good, Buster Olney!!!!

My sports writing inspiration and BBTN panelist Buster Olney then said, “A.J., I’m not sure about Sanchez. He’s not quite at the level yet, but good idea.”

I had only mentioned Sanchez in comparison to Smoltz because..well…they are both pitchers who started in the bullpen and became starters. Plus, Sanchez had already thrown a no-hitter, which I feel made him worthy of the mention.

The point is, even last year I knew the Giants were good. It was only a matter of time before they put it all together.

In a lot of ways the Giants had exactly what the 1996 Yankees had; that’s the team I thought of when I looked at them. When Madison Bumgarner tossed a shutout in Game Four, it reminded me of the same way Andy Pettitte battled in ’96.

Brian Wilson was a stud shutting down Texas, the same way John Wetteland mowed down Atlanta.

The Giants had the right mixture of talented rookies–players like Lincecum, Cain, Bumgarner, and Buster Posey–and chiseled, championship-tested veterans, like Edgar Renteria, Juan Uribe, Aaron Rowand, and Pat Burrell–all of whom have already played in (and won, no less) at least one World Series prior to 2010.

Celebrate good times.

Renteria was a great choice for World Series MVP, as he has come a long way in his career. He became only the fourth player in MLB history to knock in the game-winning run in two World Series clinching games. In 1997, Renteria knocked in the go-ahead run for the Florida Marlins in their clinching game, and of course his three-run homer won the game for the Giants last night.

With that, Renteria joined legendary Yankees Yogi Berra, Lou Gehrig, and Joe DiMaggio on the list of players who have knocked in game-winning runs in the clinching game of a World Series twice in their careers. The veteran Giant journeyman is certainly in great company.

What I also liked about the Giants winning was the fact that since 2005, the World Series Champions have alternated from league to league. Meaning:

·         2005 Chicago White Sox (A.L.)

·         2006 St. Louis Cardinals (N.L.)

·         2007 Boston Red Sox (A.L.)

·         2008 Philadelphia Phillies (N.L.)

·         2009 New York Yankees (A.L.)

·         2010 San Francisco Giants (N.L.)

It makes it more interesting because one league has not been dominating for a number of years; it’s been a back-and-forth battle for the past six years and I hope it continues this way for the next few seasons.

It's gone back-and-forth for six years running

As for the Texas Rangers? Well, they were an excellent team this season. They just seemed to have run out of gas. We found out Cliff Lee is not Jesus Christ and is a human being after all. In Game One of the fall classic, Lee only tossed 4 2/3 innings and gave up seven runs on eight hits. On the bright side the invincible Lee demonstrated his solid control and only walked one batter and struck out seven, but unfortunately it was a losing effort.

In the decisive Game Five Lee had it going right until the seventh, when he gave up a three-run home run to Renteria. As we saw in Game Four of the ALCS–A.J. Burnett’s home run to Bengie Molina–even when you are throwing a good game, one pitch can cost you the game; one bad inning can kill you.

Lee was just not the same guy in the seventh inning last night. And now, for the second year in a row, he has been on the losing World Series team. However, it does not mean he has pitched poorly in the World Series; the only forgettable game for him was Game One this year.

And of course most Yankee fans remember how incredible he was in 2009 for Philadelphia.

2011 Yankee?????

That being said, will Lee be in pinstripes next year? Right now, who’s to say? Lee has already said he would like to stay in Texas, but if the Yanks make him the right offer, there’s no telling where he will decide to go.

It’s going to be a long off-season and the Yankees already have other deals to make first, namely re-acquiring Derek Jeter who just filed for free agency. Signing back Mariano Rivera is also at the top of the Yanks’ to-do list and they also have to make Pettitte a deal, should he choose to play next season.

Yet, Yankees’ General Manager Brian Cashman has already said that another frontline starter and left-handed relief will be the focal point of this off-season. That only adds to my belief that they will indeed make a strong push for Lee when the winter meetings begin next month.

But that’s another story for another day. Today is the Giants’ day. And they deserve to be called World Series Champs in 2010. Once again, congratulations from Yankee Yapping to the fans in San Francisco and the Giants on a great season and a World Title.

I know that somewhere out in the bay area, there’s a Giants fan feeling the same way I did last year. And in 2000. And 1999. And 1998. And 1996…


Congrats once again, guys.

ALCS Over, Yanks Out

 

The ALCS IS HERE!

Last night, several memories from October of 2006 came back to me. That was a month which started off nicely and ended terribly. The Yankees had made the postseason after convincingly winning the American League East and were the favorites to win the World Series.

The Detroit Tigers dashed the Yanks’ dreams of winning the fall classic by eliminating them in the ALDS. What’s more, by the end of the month, my girlfriend broke up with me. Needless to say, in more ways than one, my spirit was overwhelmed within me; my heart was broken.

Minus the girlfriend issue, the same defeated feeling enveloped me after last night’s 6-1 loss.


Not our night.The Yanks will not go back to the World Series to defend their crown and the Texas Rangers will represent the American League in the fall classic. Texas will face either the San Francisco Giants or the Philadelphia Phillies, pending the outcome of the NLCS.

28 will have to wait. Until next year, at the very least.

A number of things went wrong for the Yankees in the ALCS and there are plenty of things to consider heading into the off-season.

The ALCS: WHAT IN THE WORLD HAPPENED?!

I’ll start with the obvious: Phil Hughes.

In the division series against the Twins, Hughes started Game Three and he was an absolute stud. The young righty shut the Twins down in seven scoreless innings of work and picked up the win in the clinching game.

When I heard Hughes was starting Game Two of the ALCS vs. Texas, I was confident. Knowing Hughes’s past against the Rangers and taking into account that he won 18 games during the regular season, I had a great feeling about his chances. After Game Five, I had said that Hughes possessed the ability to bounce back after a rough outing, and he usually did during the regular season.


Phil Hughes was ineffective in the ALCS.Although those feelings were well-founded, it did not translate to anything good.

Hughes pitched 8 2/3 innings over his two ALCS starts and coughed up a total of 11 earned runs on 14 hits. He walked seven batters and struck out six, becoming a huge part of why the Yankees lost this series. He did not give the Yankees quality, he did not give the Yankees a chance to win the two games he started, and he put the Yankees in a tough spot heading into Game Three.

In both games Hughes started in the ALCS, he registered the loss.

If Hughes had been able to win Game Two, with the Yankees going into a Game Three vs. Jesus Christ A.K.A. Cliff Lee, things could have been quite different. Every news outlet had the Yankees defeated in Game Three at the hands of Lee, and unfortunately for the Yanks it came to fruition.

And speaking of Lee, he was another vital part of the Yankees’ failure to win the pennant.

:/

In Game Three, Lee simply dominated. He made the Yankees look like Little Leaguers and his numbers this postseason (vs. Tampa Bay and New York) are absoluteLEE ridiculous.

·         24 innings pitched

·         13 hits

·         Two runs (both earned)

·         One home run allowed

·         One walk allowed

·         34 strikeouts

·         Record of 3-0

·         ERA of 0.75

Lee was plugged into the number three spot in the Rangers’ rotation because he started the final game of the ALDS vs. Tampa Bay and could not take the hill in Game One. If the pitching matchups had gone accordingly (Lee vs. CC Sabathia, ace vs. ace) I suppose things could have been different–not saying they would have, but who knows.

The Yankees would have had to face Lee tonight of they had gotten past the Rangers last night. I have a feeling now that it would not have gone well for the Bronx Bombers, but as I stated, anything can happen in a Game Seven. Would the Yanks finally have been able to get to Lee and finally remove him as thorn in their side?

 Who’s to say what could have been. I guess it makes no difference now.

Another reason they were done for was the inconsistency in the offense. Save for their 7-2 Game Five win, when runners were in scoring position, the Yankee bats turned into ghosts. They could not get it done when runners were on second and third.

Prime example: Game Three. Brett Gardner led off with a single. Derek Jeter struck out, but Gardner moved to second on a stolen base. Nick Swisher grounded out allowing Gardner to move to third. Finally Mark Teixeira came up and was set back down, ending the frame without a Yankee crossing the plate.

They were only down by two runs at that point. They could not build the run; could not even cut the lead in half. And that was just one issue.


0-for-14. Then a season ending injury. Greaaaaaat.The two key players that needed to be producing and igniting the bats were about as silent as a 1920s picture film. Teixeira (before the injury) and Alex Rodriguez were as off as they could be and could not come up with the big hit when the Yanks needed it.

Teixeira was 0-for-14 in the ALCS before the hamstring injury put him out for the remainder of the year.


A-Rod wasn't so great this year. 

Rodriguez hit .190 in the ALCS with no homers, two RBIs, three walks and four strikeouts.

No offense, no pennant.

Teixeira and Rodriguez are two huge bats in the Yankee lineup. When they are not coming up when it matters, the Yankees do not win games. The offense went dead cold at the absolute worst time to go dead cold and as a result, they did not win.

Along with the offense, the middle relief served no help. Boone Logan, Joba Chamberlain, Sergio Mitre, and David Robertson practically gave it up in the middle-to-late innings in close games, notably Games Three and Four. In Game Three the Yankees were trailing by two runs entering the top of the eighth inning.

We couldn't get no relief.

Because of them, two runs turned into eight runs, making it impossible for the Yanks to even attempt to mount a comeback in the last two frames. The Yanks lost Game Three 8-0.

In Game Four, the Yankees were only down by two runs (5-3) going into the late innings. Logan and Chamberlain both surrendered earned runs and Mitre gave up three, once again not giving the offense a chance to come back from a deficit.

The Yankees lost Game Four 10-3.

One last factor I believe was pivotal in the Yankees’ ALCS loss was Manager Joe Girardi’s decision in Game Four. I am not going to say A.J. Burnett pitched a bad game; that could not be anything further from the truth. He made maybe one or two bad pitches (notably the Bengie Molina home run) but other than that he held his own very nicely; decent command of his pitches, nasty breaking ball, and a fastball up around 96-97 mph.

We needed Game Four, Joe. CC should have pitched.

However…

The Yankees were down two games to one. They had just been dominated by Lee and they were up against a pitcher who could easily be beaten in Tommy Hunter. Down by two games and in danger of going down 3-1 (which ultimately they did) I feel Girardi should have used CC Sabathia to get them back in the series.

Had Sabathia pitched Game Four, he would not have been on three days rest, but in actuality he would have been pitching on the fourth day of rest. I truly believe that had Sabathia started, pitched the way he usually does, and won Game Four, it would have gotten the Yanks’ morale back and things may have been different.

Burnett could have pitched Game Five on Wednesday afternoon and he probably could have won, especially if he had gone out and thrown the ball as well as he did in Game Four. Not to mention it would have given the Yankees a good chance to go up 3-2 on the way back to Arlington as opposed to down 3-2.

Again, who is to say if it would have been different. But I do know that if I were Girardi, I would have gone in a different direction down two games to one and going into Game Four. Using Sabathia on three days rest worked out perfectly in 2009.

If it worked then, why should it be any different now?

There were so many things not going the Yankees’ way; the Rangers had everything clicking for them. And for a team to win the World Series (let alone get to it) everything has to be going their way.

As for Next Year…


2011.... 

I expect a number of things to be different and the Yankees need to make a few decisions regarding some of their players.

·         For one, Nick Johnson and Javier Vazquez should not be welcomed back. If the front office so much as talks to either one of these two at the possibility of coming back, they need to have their heads examined.

 

·         Marcus Thames. Do they want him to be the everyday designated hitter or would they rather have an All-Star in Lance Berkman? It’s a toughie. Thames hit 12 homers and came up in some big spots during the season. But aside from being a DH, Berkman can play the field and alleviate some pressure on Mark Teixeira at first base.

 

·         Something needs to be done about the catching situation. As much as I love Francisco Cervelli, he has no power and struggles in terms of throwing runners out. Jesus Montero and/or Austin Romine in 2011? We’ll see how they do in Spring Training…

 

·         Derek Jeter’s contract is up. The Yankees need to pay the captain and show him some respect. I would say give him four years with the option for a fifth and pay him well.

 

·         Mariano Rivera said at the beginning of the year that he doesn’t know if he is going to pitch next year. I get the feeling he will (call it a hunch) but like Jeter his contract is up. The Yankees need to make him a respectable offer and get him back.

 

·         Andy Pettitte will be 39 years old next June and a groin injury sidelined him for the better part of this past summer. His contract is also up, so it’s certainly up to him what he intends to do. If he wants to give it another try and re-sign with the Yanks, great. But if he wants to hang it up, that’s alright with me too. He’s done pretty darn well for himself over the years.

 

·         If I were the Yankees I would definitely hold onto Kerry Wood. Unlike the majority of the bullpen, he pitched like a champ in the postseason. If Rivera signs back, he is the perfect man to set him up.

 

·         Carl Crawford is a free agent. The Yankees need to decide whether or not Brett Gardner is the left fielder of the future or if they want a player with a little more power in Crawford (19 homers in 2010). I heard it said best earlier this year: “Gardner is almost like a cheaper version of Crawford.” Very true. If you want my opinion at the moment, Crawford no. Gardner yes.

 

·         The manager. Along with Jeter, Rivera, and Pettitte, Joe Girardi’s contract is up.  There has been some speculation as to whether or not he will come back to manage the Yankees and I have heard some chatter about the possibility of the Chicago Cubs wanting the Yankee skipper to manage them.


Joe Girardi to the Cubs? 

 That speculation has me wondering, especially since the Cubs recently told Ryne Sandberg they do not want him to manage them. Are they waiting to negotiate with Girardi? I’m unsure. Kim Jones of the YES Network tweeted last night that she expects Girardi to return. She is more of an insider than me, so right now I believe her.

But then again, anything is possible when a lot of money is involved. If the Cubs make him the right offer, he might be leaving town. And the question is, if he does leave town who replaces him? I certainly have no answer to that question.

 

·         The biggest free agent of them all: Cliff Lee. This past July, Lee was literally within hours of becoming a Yankee. The Yanks were ready to ship out minor leaguers and money to Seattle and land the dominate lefty, but it was not meant to be. Texas swiped him out from under the Yanks’ nose and as a result, he helped lead them past the Yankees to the pennant.

Next year Lee is a free agent and according to several insiders, Texas will never be able to pay him, especially if the Rangers win the title; if Texas wins it all, Lee’s value will steadily rise and all the big market teams including the Yankees, Red Sox, and Angels will undoubtedly be out to get him.

 

Lee a Yankee in '11???

If you want my insight as of right now, Lee will be in pinstripes in 2011. When the Yanks almost got him from Seattle this year, Lee and Sabathia’s wives were talking about where he might live in New York.

Plus from their Cleveland days, Sabathia and Lee are great friends. In fact when they squared off against one another in the ’09 World Series, they spent time with each other off the field. Just from that, I have a feeling Lee is headed for the big apple.

Bottom line: we could not beat him so we might as well join him.  

 

 

 


:(Derek Jeter usually says, “It’s a failed season if we (the Yankees) do not win the World Series.” The captain has the attitude of the late George Steinbrenner, and I know that somewhere in Heaven last night, the Boss had that disappointed look on his face; he was turning his head and throwing his hands outwardly as if to say, “The hell with this.”

I know that’s what I was doing.

I felt at the beginning of the season that a lot of the magic had left the team. I know Johnny Damon, Hideki Matsui, and Melky Cabrera did not have the best years numerically this season (especially Cabrera) but they were all part of what made the 2009 Yankees so special.

Remember these guys?

While the yanks were getting beaten last night by a clearly better team in the Texas Rangers, I thought about Damon stealing two bases in one play and later scoring on an Alex Rodriguez double. I thought about Matsui single-handedly tearing apart the Phillies in Game Six of the World Series last season–an accomplishment worthy of the World Series MVP honor.

I even thought about Cabrera’s weak groundout that turned into an error in Game Two of the ’09 ALCS, in which Jerry Hairston came around and scored the winning run.

And then I wondered where that all magic went? It simply wasn’t inside the group of players known as the 2010 Yankees.


Texas had the magic.Yet it was inside the Texas Rangers and I tip my cap to them. I won’t act as a sore loser; I won’t be angry with them, they wanted it more. The magic that was in the 2009 Yankees is in the 2010 Rangers. Perhaps now they can do what the Yankees did last year; go into the fall classic and show the National League who rules the MLB.

In any event it was disappointing for every Yankee fan. We took a huge step forward last year, we seemed to be moving in the right direction but it was just halted at the hands of a hotter team.

Yet who knows what can happen next year. If the Yankees make the correct moves in the off-season, they will be the team to be beat. 2009 may serve as our modern day 1996, meaning:

The Yanks won it all in 1996. They lost it in 1997, only to go on a huge World Series winning streak in 1998, ’99, and ’00.

In 2009 the Yankees won the World Series, but came up short in 2010. Maybe 2011, 2012, and 2013 can be the next Yankee Dynasty.

New dynasty starts next year?

We’ll see. Anything can happen in baseball.

 

 

 At this time I’d like to extend a HUGE THANKS to everyone who read and kept up with Yankee Yapping this year. It was a fun season. I only wish it had turned out a little better in the end for our beloved Bronx Bombers.

The Yankee Yapping Facebook page is up to just over 730 “likes.” I hope it can grow a little more and maybe get up to 1,000 soon! Once again thanks for the support. This blog would be nothing without its loyal readers.

I’ll definitely be blogging during the off-season and over the winter while the hot stove cooks.

Just keep your heads up Yankee fans. And remember that we’ll always have 2009 and our 27 titles. It’s not the end of the world and the Yankees WILL be back on top in the future. It always happens.

Until then, GO YANKEES!!!


27-time Kings. Maybe 28 next year.

ALCS Game 5

 

The ALCS IS HERE!

The Texas Rangers will have to wait for another day. And if the Yankees have their way in the end, they will have to wait for another year.

Facing elimination in Game Five of the American League Championship Series, the New York Yankees pulled through and beat the Rangers 7-2, coming off three consecutive losses. The ALCS will now move to a Game Six on Friday night with the Yanks now trailing three games to two.

No A.L. pennant for Texas yet. The Yankees are alive.

The Bronx Bombers broke out of their offensive slump in the bottom of the second, plating three runs to take command. Jorge Posada brought some redemption to himself following his unproductive pinch-hit at bat last night. The Yankee catcher ignited the offense with an RBI single to score Alex Rodriguez.

Later in the frame, Curtis Granderson singled to score Lance Berkman and Posada came around to score on a throwing error by Jeff Francoeur.


Swish! You are alive???!With the Yanks leading 3-0 in the bottom of the third, a scuffling Nick Swisher came out of his funk with a solo home run to left field, his first of the ALCS, putting the Yanks ahead 4-0.

Right after Swisher’s shot, Robinson Cano took Texas starter C.J. Wilson deep with a home run of his own, his fourth of the ALCS, giving the Yanks a convincing 5-0 edge. With the homer, Cano tied a record for home runs in the ALCS, becoming the 10th player in Major League Baseball history to have four homers in an LCS.

There goes the BOOOOOOOM! Four ALCS  homers for Cano!

Josh Hamilton, who was 1-for-4 with a strikeout today, also has four homers this series.

In the bottom of the fifth, Berkman drove in a run with a sacrifice fly scoring Swisher, and Granderson smacked a solo home run in the eighth, sticking the proverbial nail in the Rangers’ Game Five coffin.

“I saw something in the players’ eyes; I saw determination and there was a good mood during batting practice,” Yankee manager Joe Girardi said to the media after the victory.

“I felt like they would do it, because as I have been saying they are resilient. We have been through difficult games and have bounced back. As a manager, you appreciate it.”

 Texas only managed two runs off Yankee ace CC Sabathia, who was certainly in better control than he was in Game One of the series. Sabathia threw six innings and gave up two runs on 11 hits. He walked no batters and struck out seven.

Sabathia bent, but he did not break.

The only real pest for Sabathia was Matt Treanor, who hit a solo home run to left field in the fifth and drove in a run with a groundout to third in the sixth, which plated David Murphy.


The Beast.Other than Treanor’s RBIs, Sabathia battled valiantly.

Kerry Wood followed Sabathia nicely and held the Rangers to no runs in relief, tossing two scoreless innings and only allowing one hit. He also picked Elvis Andrus off second base, his second pickoff of the ALCS. In Game One, Wood picked Ian Kinsler off first.

Mariano Rivera closed the game out with a scoreless ninth, giving the Yankees their first win of the ALCS since Game One.

Now the Yanks and Rangers will get their boots, spurs, 10 gallon hats, and stirrups, because they are heading back to Texas for Game Six on Friday night.

Yeaaaaaaaaah!  

Phil Hughes (1-1, 5.70 ERA) will take the hill for New York, looking to push the series to a Game Seven on Saturday night. Hughes will be opposed by Colby Lewis (1-0, 1.69 ERA).

 

 

As I am well-aware, I did not blog about Game Four, because it was too difficult to even think about; too painful. Game Four basically personified this ALCS up until today, as the Yankees seemed to be in control only to have everything collapse on them. A.J. Burnett was dealing and pitching nicely, but along came Bengie Molina; he spoiled it with the two-run home run.

 And from there…it turned ugly. A 10-3 loss and the Yankees’ backs are against the wall.

But they responded in a huge way this afternoon. Facing elimination the offense woke up and did what they needed to do to win. I had posted something derogatory about Swisher earlier in the day and (of course) as soon as I said something bad about him, he homered.

“Nick Swisher walks into a bar. The bartender says, ‘We have a drink named after you.’ Swisher replies, ‘Really? You have a drink named I stink in the postseason?’”

And as soon as I said that, he went deep. Figures. I’m just thankful he did something productive.

But if the offense clicks on Friday the way they did today, the chances of a Game Seven are very likely. Every Yankee hitter has practically been dormant for the past three games, but they awoke from their slumber today. Seven runs, nine hits, and they drew six walks.

They need just two more games like that and the pennant is theirs.

If you ask me, I am looking at this situation the same way I looked at the American League Division Series. Right now, there are factors working in the Yanks’ favor and things working against them…

Taking congrats.

For the Yankees

·         Phil Hughes in Game Six.

Not only has he pitched in an elimination game and dominated (Game Three of the ALDS, October of 2007 vs. Cleveland) but he has done better on the road. Especially in Texas; after all (as noted several times) he nearly no-hit the Rangers in May of 2007. Not to mention, Hughes has not really had two consecutive starts in a row where he has been knocked around. When he lost this season, he usually bounced back with a solid game.

 

·         Andy Pettitte in Game Seven.  

Pettitte is the winningest pitcher in postseason history and in the only game he pitched in the ALCS, he was a stud. He made one mistake to Josh Hamilton, but other than that, he was lights out. Pettitte clinched Game Three of the ALDS this year and was on the mound for every clinching game in 2009, including the World Series.

 

·         Game Seven, if the Yankees get there

The Yankees know what it’s like to play in a Game Seven. Texas has never been there. If the Yankees win on Friday, it’s a brand new ALCS; it’s winner-take-all. Game Seven is basically a one-game playoff. The Yankees know what it’s like to be in the position of win or go home in the ALCS. Texas has faced elimination in the past, but never in a Game Seven; not in the Championship Series.

And as we have all seen in the past, especially 2003 and 2004, ANYTHING can happen in Game Seven.

Anything goes and everyone is available. “No holds barred,” if you will.

 

·         The Way Alex Rodriguez Swung the Bat Today

If the Yanks want to win, they need their cleanup man to hit. That’s the bottom line. Today A-Rod picked up one hit, walked twice, and scored a run, letting everyone know that he is not asleep and can come through when need be.

Rodriguez spent three years in Texas, dominating in offensive categories. Hopefully he can brush off some of that Texas power and dominate Arlington the way he did when he played there.

If A-Rod is on, look out Texas pitchers.

 

·         Texas Record at home this Postseason

At home this October, the Rangers have only won one game, which was Game Two of the ALCS. They are 1-3 in Arlington, and they have only averaged 4.3 runs per game in their home ballpark this postseason.


I am over-Lee concerned. 

 

Against the Yankees

·         Cliff Lee in Game Seven.

It’s hard to ignore the giant elephant in the room. There’s no doubt that Lee was a monster in Game Three. A scary monster; more terrifying than Freddy Krueger, Jason Voorhees, Michael Myers, Dracula, The Frankenstein Monster, Jaws, the Wolfman, and the Boogeyman combined.  

I understand Halloween is almost upon us, but I really do not want to see a monster like Lee in a big game. I’d rather wait until Halloween to be afraid of things like that.

 

·         Josh Hamilton

He has killed the Yankees this whole ALCS. With his fans in Texas cheering him on, and the fact that people are already talking him up to be the MVP of the series, Hamilton (like Lee) frightens me. He also has four homers off Yankee pitching, solidifying his status as a thorn in the Yanks’ side.

 

·         Absence of Mark Teixeira

Yesterday, the Yankees’ first baseman was lost for the remainder of the postseason, running awkwardly to first base on a ground ball and injuring his hamstring in the process. Although “Big Tex” had not being producing much in the ALCS (0-for-14 in the series) he is still a presence; he still has that force about him that can scare pitchers and he has the ability to make a pitcher labor.

As bad as he was performing, he is still Mark Teixeira. He was there when the Yanks needed him to come through in Game One of the ALDS; that home run to untie the game is not far from my mind.

 

·         Lance Berkman’s Fall

Going for a popup in foul territory today, the newly appointed Yankee first baseman took a bit of a tumble and landed squarely on his rear end. According to Girardi, Berkman will have to undergo some treatment before the game on Friday night.

 


Berkman?!! 

“He hurt his lower back/upper glut,” the skipper said.

 After the fall, Berkman stuck it out and played the remainder of the game. Today he was 0-for-2 with a walk, an RBI, and a run scored, but he did not pick up a hit. That being said, there’s no telling how Berkman will swing the bat the rest of the postseason.

 

·         David Murphy in Game Six

The 29 year-old outfielder smacked a home run and drove in two runs in Game Two off Hughes. If he does anything close to that in Game Six…needless to say, it might be a hugh-mongous problem.

 

 

Everyone must keep in mind that the Yankees know where they are. As Manager Girardi said, they are resilient; the have been down before but have come back to win, much like they did today. The skipper said that he is confident with his club and they went out today and played a good game.

And that they did. The Yankees undoubtedly played with soul today.

Now what every Yankee fan has to do now is just believe.

Believe in Phil Hughes.

Believe in the offense and their ability to score runs.

Believe in the bullpen.

Believe. Believe. Believe.

And to paraphrase Johnny Damon after Game Three of the ALCS in 2004,

“If there’s a group of guys who can do it, it’s us!!!” (I’m sorry I cannot call the Yankees “idiots.” Sorry Johnny. Wish you were still here, by the way)

See you all after Game Six.


Strike back!

ALCS Game 3

 

The ALCS IS HERE!

The Yankees trailed the Texas Rangers 2-0 for the better part of Game Three of the American League Championship Series tonight. You would have thought they were trailing 200-0 the way Texas starter Cliff Lee was dealing.

The Rangers went on to win 8-0 behind Lee’s gem, putting themselves ahead two games to one in the ALCS and setting up Game Four tomorrow night.


:/ 

Up until the ninth inning, the difference in the game was a first inning, two-run home run off the bat of Josh Hamilton. After that, it was “The Cliff Lee Show,” as the dominant lefty puzzled the Yankees for eight strong innings of two-hit ball. Lee walked only one batter and struck out 13, proving once again that he owns the Yankees when it comes to big games.

Case in point: Game One of the World Series last season.

The closest the Yankees ever got to a run tonight was in the bottom of the sixth inning. Brett Gardner led off with a single, exciting the Yankee crowd. After a steal of second, Derek Jeter struck out and Nick Swisher grounded out, allowing Gardner to move to third. Mark Teixeira ended the inning with a groundout to short, silencing the boisterous Bronx and leaving Gardner stranded.

 

Closest we got

Yankee starter Andy Pettitte matched Lee well, tossing seven innings of two-run ball allowing five hits. The winningest pitcher in postseason history did not walk any batters and struck out five


Studly.In a word, Pettitte was studly. Unfortunately it did not translate into another playoff win.

Up 2-0 in the ninth, the Rangers put up six more runs up on the board. Nelson Cruz and Bengie Molina drove in runs with RBI singles and Mitch Moreland singled to knock in two. Elvis Andrus followed suit with an RBI double of his own. Moreland came in to score on a wild pitch by reliever Sergio Mitre, topping off the Rangers’ ninth inning outburst.

Quite a forgettable night for the Yankees, to say the least.

In a critical Game Four tomorrow night, the Yankees will send A.J. Burnett to the mound, who has not pitched since Oct. 2. There is certainly going to be a lot of talk about whether or not the Yankees should use CC Sabathia on short rest or risk it and give the ball to Burnett. However, according to the way Sabathia practiced today, Burnett will start Game Five.


I hope he has what it takes.Burnett will face Tommy Hunter, who is 0-1 with a 4.50 ERA in one start this postseason.

 

 

This was easily one of the more frustrating games I have seen all season. As I said, you would think the Yanks were trailing 200-0 all night, not 2-0. The offense was overmatched and I can only say that they needed to wake up. Easier said than done, but Texas is sending a pitcher out tomorrow who can be hit, as evidenced by the Tampa Bay Rays in the ALDS.

Tampa Bay chased Hunter from his start in four innings.

But…

1-for -21 (this whole ALCS) with runners in scoring position is not going to get it done.

On the postgame show, analyst Michael Kay made an excellent point. He said that he would have loved to see what would have happened if the score was still 2-0 heading into the bottom of the ninth inning.


Lee in the ninth? Washington said yes. 

Would Lee have stayed out there? (Ron Washington later said he would have sent him out)

If Neftali Feliz had come in only up by two runs and the stadium rocking, at 22 years old, would he have been able to hold it together? Would that magic have sparked for the Yankees? Would they have come back to win only down two runs?

I guess we’ll never know.

It seems that Yankee skipper Joe Girardi will stay with his decision to start Burnett tomorrow. Everyone in the Yankee-fan world (including me) is scared. He has not pitched in 17 days and as we all know, nobody knows how he will do.

With Burnett, it is feast or famine; he is lights out or he gets his lights knocked out. This season vs. Texas, Burnett is 1-0 with a 2.50 ERA in three starts. The numbers in Game Four are undoubtedly leaning the Yankees’ way, in contrast to Game Three when everyone expected Jesus Christ A.K.A. Cliff Lee to dominate us, which he did.

But the regular season numbers don’t really mean much at this point. The postseason is a new season.

The Yankees’ are now trailing 2-1 in the ALCS.

And now their postseason hopes are lying squarely on the shoulders of a man named A.J. …


Hope he's smiling after tomorrow night's game...If Burnett does not pitch well or more importantly if the Yankee bats do not wake up from their coma, winter may come early for the Bronx Bombers.

“We are only down 2-1 and we have to go out and play a good game tomorrow. We’ll feel different. It’s frustrating that we lost two in a row, but we’re resilient; you don’t win 95 games in our division without being resilient. We’ve lost two in a row before this season and have come back to win the next one. Tomorrow is a new day. The sun will come up and we’ll get them tomorrow.”

–Joe Girardi, after the game.

ALCS Games 1 and 2

 

The ALCS IS HERE!

Game One was a blur to me. I wish Game Two was a blur to me instead.

The American League Championship Series is tied 1-1 with the New York Yankees and Texas Rangers are heading back to Yankee Stadium for Game Three, which will be played on Monday night.

Game One: Yankees 6, Rangers 5. And I don’t remember much about it.

Yankees took Game 1 from the Rangers in Texas

My cousin Joe had a few people over at his place to watch Game One, and let’s just say I had a few drinks. I don’t get drunk often, but after Josh Hamilton’s three run homer, I figured I should start drinking. I felt I needed to ease the pain of a Game One Yankee loss.

But by the time the eighth inning came and the Yankees mounted their comeback, I was gone. Here is what I do remember about it:

·         I told everyone at my cousin’s house that I one day want to have a son and name him “Merrill.” I have no idea why I said this or where that came from.

 

·         There’s a picture of me sliding across the floor with my arms outstretched, as if to say “Safe!”

 

·         I supposedly jumped on my friend Brian several times screaming, “They came back! They came back! I told you they’d come back!”

 

·         When the Yankees started their rally, apparently I acted nuts, jumping up and down and waving my hands around like a third base coach.

 

For all the kids reading this, don’t drink. Alcohol makes you say and do weird things.

Yet there was certainly a lot to be happy about. The Yankees stole the game from under the Rangers; in all honesty, they were outplayed until the eighth. The Yanks really had no business winning the game, what with their ace CC Sabathia only throwing up four innings of five run ball. Sabathia uncharacteristically walked four batters and only struck out three.

Bad day.

In a word, the Yankee ace was off. He brought nothing with him to Arlington.

Dustin Moseley bailed him out with a great performance in relief and for his effort he registered the win. Kerry Wood also pitched in with a good inning and a pickoff of Ian Kinsler. And who else but Mariano Rivera pitched the ninth to pick up his 42nd postseason save and secure the thieved win.

Yankees go up 1-0. Fast forward to my hangover today.

Rangers 7, Yankees 2. And I wish I couldn’t remember anything about it.

Following in the footsteps of Sabathia last night, Phil Hughes brought nothing with him to the ballpark. The 24 year-old righty pitched four innings and gave up seven earned runs on 10 hits. He walked three batters and struck out three.

Awwwww, Phil.

The Rangers pounded every mistake Hughes made. He was leaving his pitches out over the plate, missing locations, and the Rangers feasted. Especially David Murphy, who not only smacked a solo home run off Hughes, but also knocked in a run with a double.

Hughes started Game Three of the American League Division Series at home, but was put into the number two spot in the starting rotation because of his history, not only on the road but in Texas. Along with giving up fewer home runs on the road as opposed to home this season, Hughes nearly tossed a no-hitter against the Rangers in Texas in May of 2007.

I understand the logic of using Hughes in Game Two. Unfortunately it did not translate or pay off.


Cano has it right. The rest of the offense needs to find it. 

The only bright spot for the Yanks was Robinson Cano, who blasted a long home run into the upper deck in right field. It was his second home run in as many games, as Cano has certainly been swinging a hot bat this month.

The ALCS will now have to go at least five games, and the next three will be played on the Yankees’ turf.

Playing at the big ballpark in the Bronx probably doesn’t bother Rangers’ Game Three Starter Cliff Lee, who won two ALDS games on the road vs. the Tampa Bay Rays.  Not to mention Lee shut down the Yankees in Game One of the World Series last year, puzzling the Yankee offense for a complete game win.

But the Yanks cannot let Lee and his hype get to them. It’s not an automatic win for Texas.

The Bombers win turn to veteran lefty and the winningest pitcher in postseason history, Andy Pettitte. At 19 wins, Pettitte will gun for his 20th in Game Three, looking to flip the “on switch,” if you will; erase the two subpar starts by Sabathia and Hughes in the first two games.

Big-Game Andy.

Overall it was a rough loss for the Yankees today. But I advise the Yankees and all Yankee fans everywhere to keep their heads up; do not assume Game Three is a loss because of Lee. The Yankees just have to be a lot more aggressive offensively than they were today (especially Mark Teixeira…it seemed he wasn’t swinging at any good pitches today).  They just have to hop on Lee and swing the bat.

Everyone just remember a number of things during the off-day tomorrow

1)       The series is TIED, the Yankees are not down. They are not facing elimination on Monday night and there is a little more margin for error in the ALCS because it is a seven game series.

 

2)      The Yankees have been here before.

 

3)      Anything can happen in October. Just because Lee has dominated us in the past does not mean he will do it on Monday.

 

4)      A.J. Burnett will not see the ball in Game Four if the Yankees lose Game Three…but then again, he could have done exactly what Sabathia and Hughes did today (So everyone can probably stop crucifying Burnett and start worrying more about the rest of the rotation)

 

5)      Everyone just relax. Enjoy some NFL action tomorrow and we’ll go back to the ALCS on Monday.

  

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