Results tagged ‘ MLB.com ’

Moving Right Along

hotstovefire

While there’s plenty of offseason left and the Yankees haven’t seen a lot of back page action, there’ve been a few recent stories from the so-called “Bronx Bomber Front,” if you will.

First and foremost, the Yankees signed back 2007’s two breakout pitchers, Phil Hughes and Joba Chamberlain, inking both to one-year deals to avoid arbitration. Hughes was signed back for $7.15 million while Chamberlain was given just $1.88 million – startling, considering these two were pegged as the future of the Yankee pitching staff, and they’re coming back on a dime with no long-term commitment.

The 27-year-old promising rookies of ’07 haven’t exactly shown much promise.

jobphil1

In this writer’s opinion, 2013 will be their final chance to prove whether or not they are truly the new breed of Yankee arms. Last year Hughes went 16-13 with an ERA of 4.23, which is somewhat respectable for a middle-of-the-rotation starter, but he was second in the majors in the home runs allowed category with 35. Not to mention he gave up two more long balls in the playoffs while posting a record of 0-1 in October.

If Hughes doesn’t get it straightened out this coming season, I’m afraid his time in pinstripes may be up. His main problem, as noted every year in Spring Training, seems to be his faith, or lack of faith, in his breaking ball. Hughes is characteristically a high-fastball pitcher, and when he hangs his breaking ball, hitters absolutely feast off it.

mlb_a_hughes11_600

Bottom line: Hughes needs to right many wrongs this year, if he wants to stay a Yankee.

Chamberlain’s biggest problem in recent seasons has undoubtedly been his inability to stay healthy. In 2012 Chamberlain logged just 20.2 innings in 22 games, a bizarre ankle injury claiming most of his season.

It got worse for him in the playoffs when, in Game 4 of the ALDS, Matt Wieters of the Baltimore Orioles shattered his bat facing him; the broken shard of wood coming back and striking Chamberlain in the elbow, forcing him out of the game.

hi-res-153963952_crop_exact

Aside from an electric debut in 2007 and a 2009 World Series ring, I would say it’s not unfair to compare Chamberlain to another injury-prone pitcher: Carl Pavano – who, I just read today, ruptured his spleen shoveling snow.

Why am I not surprised? Only Pavano. I mean…who else would that happen to?

But back to Chamberlain.

2013 will be a test for him. And if he fails, like Hughes, Chamberlain might have to bow out of the Bronx – and as we saw with Nick Swisher, it could potentially be a not-so-gracious departure.

Along with Hughes and Chamberlain, the Bombers announced the re-signing of another 27-year-old pitcher, David Robertson. The setup man from Alabama received $3.1 million for one year, also avoiding arbitration.

Seattle Mariners v New York Yankees

Typical move that made sense. Obviously the Yankees weren’t letting go of him. I suppose they got him for so cheap because of his 2-7 record last year – as he also proved he may not be suited to fill Mariano Rivera’s cleats. In his first save opp following Rivera’s season-ending injury, Robertson blew it vs. Tampa Bay and lost the closer role out to Rafael Soriano, who as we recently learned walked to the Washington Nationals.

Thankfully for the Yankees, Rivera is returning. And I expect Mo to be Mo, barring any lingering effects from his torn ACL. If his body responds nicely, it’s good news for the Bombers. However, as we saw with Chien-Ming Wang a few years back, leg injuries can damage a pitcher’s footing, causing a world of problems.

Then again, Wang’s injury was different from Rivera’s. Wang injured his pivot foot running home during an interleague game in Houston. Nonetheless, we’ll find out just how Mo will do after he runs out of the Yankee bullpen in April, “Enter Sandman” blaring through the Yankee Stadium speakers.

In addition to the retention of some pitchers, the Yankees announced that on March 30, in their last exhibition before Opening Day, they will travel to West Point and face the ARMY baseball team at the United States Military Academy.

4475782146_bdf94b2226_o

Ever since they announced this special game, I’ve been wondering which key players the Yankees will bring to West Point. Being two days before Opening Day, I’m not exactly sure if many of the regulars, like Derek Jeter, Curtis Granderson, Kevin Youkilis, Ichiro, Mark Teixeira, and Robinson Cano, will be playing.

I could see them bringing a few bigs, but certainly not all of them. I’d also like to explore the possibility of covering this game, if humanly possible. I might have to ask my publisher and editors to contact West Point for a credential to get in. I’d be honored to cover such a game, even though it’s simply an exhibition.

One player who won’t be at West Point on March 30 (at least not there to play, anyway) is Alex Rodriguez. The third baseman had surgery on Jan. 16 to repair a torn labrum, a procedure that was said to have gone off without a hitch.

Today Yankee General Manager Brian Cashman was interviewed on WFAN radio in New York and said Rodriguez may miss the entire 2013 season, although it is believed he could be back after the All-Star break.

A-Rod is signed on for a long time – through 2017, to be exact. I’m probably not in the minority here; a lot of folks probably feel the same way, but I for one would be interested to see how the Yanks would fare for a whole year without the 37-year-old slugger-in-decline. The postseason, should the Yankees make it, would be most interesting sans A-Rod, for sure.

alg-alex-rodriguez-pout-jpg

Think about it: if the Yankees go all the way with no Rodriguez, it’ll be the classic “we never needed A-Rod to win” mind frame. By chance the Yankees get ousted early – or don’t make the postseason at all, for that matter – it’ll be the heavy “we need A-Rod to win” spiel.

Again, interesting for sure.

In the meantime, pitchers and catchers will be reporting to Tampa on Feb. 12 and their first full workout will take place the very next day. Position players report to camp on Feb. 17; their first full team workout scheduled, again, for the following day.

The Yanks’ first exhibition game will happen on Feb. 23 at the Braves – the tune-up games beginning nine days earlier because of the World Baseball Classic this spring. Teixeira will play for the USA team, which will be managed by former Yankee skipper Joe Torre.

Cano will play for the Dominican Republic squad, so even though real, meaningful baseball will not completely return until April 1, we’ll be treated to some Yankees playing in games featuring quality competition.

Until then, basketball and next Sunday’s Super Bowl are dominating the sports pages. Just for the heck of it, I’ll entertain you guys with a story from a high school girls’ basketball game I covered a couple weeks back.

…………………………………………………………………………………………

llforblog

Basically this winter my editor put me on the girls hoops beat. My responsibility is to attend games and write about the girls’ basketball teams in our coverage area – and our newspaper has two of the top-ranked teams in New York state, which makes the job a lot of fun. The girls have been enjoying a tremendous amount of success these past two months.

On Thursday Jan. 10 I was covering a game; the final score being 38-32. Pretty close and low-scoring game, all the way through.

After interviewing the coaches from the winning team and the losing team, collecting their thoughts and impressions, I went to interview the girl with the most points on the winning side. The young lady, a junior forward, finished with 19 points (including two, 3-point field goals) leading all scorers.

Before I could conduct my interview, her friend ran up to her and embraced her, giving her a big hug. Standing next to her with my recorder in hand, ready to conduct the interview, her friend (in an attempt to be discreet, although I heard every word) asked her,

“Is that your boyfriend?”

She looked at me chuckled and replied, “No, he’s…the interviewer.”

Confused, yet aware of what her friend had asked her, I looked at her and said,

“Wait, did she just…”

Smiling, and clearly a little embarrassed, she mustered the response,

“Yeah, she did.”

With a beat red face I tried my best to shake it off, and then carried on, conducting my interview with her.

First of all, at 25 years old I’m so glad I look young enough to still be in high school. Makes me feel so grown up. And secondly, when things like this happen, it gives me more and more motivation and incentive to want to take the next step in my career; cover pro sports and not just high school games – risking incidents similar to this one because I apparently look as if I belong on “Barney & Friends.”

ten

Not that I haven’t had a taste of pro sports coverage – I did, covering the Hudson Valley Renegades and Eli Manning’s appearance at the Guiding Eyes Golf Classic this past summer – but I’d like to expand upon that; do a lot more of it, more consistently.

MLB.com. YES Network. #GetAtMeBro

What Makes a Great Sports Writer?

On May 20, 1927, a fight was held at Yankee Stadium. Jack Sharkey vs. Jack Dempsey. Joe Humphreys, the ring announcer, came to the center of the ring and asked for silence.

He had no megaphone, and no microphone, but he screamed at the audience to quiet down.

“May I have your attention? Silence please! Silence please!”

After a few more times, the audience finally quieted down.

“Ladies and gentlemen, young Charles Lindbergh is in the air. May God save him for a safe flight. Bow your head in prayer.”

After a moment of silence, the capacity crowd at Yankee Stadium said, in unison, “Amen.”

I first heard this rather unique story told by Bert Randolph Sugar, a renowned sports historian, writer, author, journalist, and analyst. Sunday evening ESPN reported Sugar, 75, passed away from cardiac arrest and heart complications.

The news of Sugar’s passing in a lot of ways shook me up. He was a colorful reporter, and a well-spoken individual. Sugar’s forte, or his passion if you will, was boxing. Typically seen with his trademark cigar, he was probably the best writer ever when it came to reporting on action inside the squared circle, as evidenced by his induction into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 2005.

But writing and reporting about boxing wasn’t all he could do from a sports journalism standpoint. Sugar had such range, being able to talk about and analyze sports other than boxing.

As a matter of fact, Sugar wrote a baseball book and even co-authored a book about pro wrestling. A wealth of sports knowledge and a well-respected historian, Sugar will be sorely missed.

There were just so many things that made him an elite, top-notch sports writer.

As a young journalist, cutting my teeth into the business, Sugar has left me a wonderful example of what a sports writer should be. The ability to story-tell, range, and knowledge are three essential skills that are basically must-haves for all sports writers, and there’s no question Sugar possessed each of them. 

The media studies department at my alma mater, Mercy College, holds an award ceremony called the Quill Awards at the end of every academic year. Typically at the Quills, a Mercy alumnus is given an award, a journalist in the field receives a special recognition, and students in the department are rewarded for their hard work throughout the school year.

I served two years as sports editor of The Impact, Mercy’s student newspaper. Because of that service, I received the Quill for sports reporting in 2009 and the year I graduated, 2010.

The second time I was given the award (which also happened to be about a month before I graduated) for my work as far as sports reporting, it felt good to hear my journalism professor acknowledge my dedication. He announced to everyone in attendance at the ceremony that I would be “a sports writer you will be hearing about.”

And in a sense, I have gotten my name out there. At least a little bit.

ESPN has featured my insight on their “Baseball Tonight” show multiple times, the YES Network has put some of my thoughts on their “Extra Innings” postgame show, and even MLB has showcased Yankee Yapping on its main page.

As far as work I’ve had the opportunity to interview and hear stories from interesting players, like former Yankee John Flaherty and Seattle Mariners’ relief pitcher Brian Sweeney.

I had the chance to interview former baseball coach Rick Wolff, who is the son of former Yankee announcer Bob Wolff – the famed announcer who called Don Larsen’s perfect game in the 1956 World Series. In fact, it was Mr. Wolff that encouraged me to start my own blog, putting the idea of Yankee Yapping in my head.

Recently, I had the chance to cover a high school basketball game sitting next to Yankee legend Bernie Williams – and got to chit-chat with him watching his daughter play ball.

If I had to sum it all up in one word, to this point: blessed. I personally know sports writers who have graduated from college that are struggling greatly to kick-start their careers, so taking into consideration everything I have accomplished thus far, I truly believe “blessed” is the correct word to use.

Either “blessed” or maybe just “lucky.”

Former U.S. Supreme Court Justice Earl Warren once said, “The front page chronicles man’s defeats. The sports page chronicles man’s triumphs.”

Sugar made his whole life chronicling man’s triumphs – which is why I think I love the sports writing business so much. I take so much pride in attending games and writing about the swagger of individual players and teams.    

I’ve had quite a few people use certain adjectives to describe my writing. An old friend once called it “amazing” and “incredible.”

As nice as that is to hear, I look at Sugar’s work and a lot of the other writers out there, and the same logic repeats in my mind:

“I may be good, but it’s going to be awhile before I get up to that level.”

And it is my hope that one day I am at the level of a Bert Sugar, because when it was all said and done for him, he was one of the most respected, renowned, and well-loved sports pundits in the world. For his intelligence and wide array of sports knowledge, he will never be forgotten – at least not in this writer’s mind.

 Rest in Peace Bert Randolph Sugar (1937-2012)

 

Exist to Inspire

Think back to the glorious 2009 season for a second. On May 15, Brett Gardner hit an inside-the-park home run, starting what would be a 5-4 come-from-behind win over the Minnesota Twins – a win which this author attended.

What most people didn’t know (until after the game) was that he had visited a hospital during the day and met with Alyssa Esposito, a young lady who was set to undergo a heart transplant. She had given Gardner a bracelet, telling him that if he held onto it he would hit a home run.

God must have been working his will that night. It was an incredible story.

I caught up with Esposito in June of last year, conducting an interview with her. Since then I have kept in touch, and so has she, as she is a fan of Yankee Yapping on Facebook.

Apparently she caught my last two video blog posts and sent me something that warmed my heart; something that convinced me that I really am as good as I said I was in the first video I posted.

Here is what she had to say to me:

“A.J.,

I watched both of your videos and I just want to say that you inspire me to be just as confident as you are.

I can finally write my book now that both brain tumors are gone. You inspire me to write and be more confident in myself that I can accomplish anything. You do what you need to do and do what makes you happy.

I love that you put your all into your work and make it your best. And I love how honest you are.

No one expects you to be perfect. You are original and stay that way. You have such passion for what you do, if only everyone was like that. I’ve grown to love baseball. It’s all I think about. It makes me calm and happy.

There is no other feeling like being in a stadium and soaking in every second. I want to learn everything there is to know about baseball.

I wish you nothing but the best.”

 

This really made me feel wonderful. In reality I am only writing and doing what I love to do, but for someone who has been through so much – a heart transplant and multiple surgeries – I can’t help but think about my problems (and yes, recently I have been going through some stuff, nothing as serious as a heart transplant, however).

My problems (and trying to overcome them) don’t even measure up to the challenges Alyssa has faced and triumphed over. It really made me think and put some of my feelings (lately) into perspective. For her to say such nice words and go as far as calling me an inspiration really touched my heart.

I never thought when I began this journey called “Yankee Yapping” in July of 2009 that it would make such an impact on so many people; that it would evolve into what it is today.

Since I have started this blog, it has been featured on MLB.com twice. Yeah, twice guys…twice! If you’re going to feature me why not hire me to work for you? Oh sorry. I forgot. You’re more interested in the Fan Cave and paying guys to do nothing…

But I digress.

I made my aunt smile when my uncle passed away, ESPN’s Buster Olney re-tweeted my little investigation from back in February, I was able to publish an interview with a major leaguer, and now I am an inspiration to a young lady who has gone head-to-head with unbelievable obstacles – obstacles that I could never even fathom.

At this time I would just like to thank Alyssa for her kind words.

Most people look at their parents, their heroes, and their friends for inspiration. I never would have guessed I could have inspired someone with my attitude and my work – much less a person who has been through as much as Alyssa.

And I think I learned something, too: you don’t have to be rich and famous to inspire someone. You just have to have an attitude that someone admires and looks up to.

 Me an inspiration? It’s the first time I have ever heard it. I just hope it won’t be the last.

Funny Story About Last Night…

I went to the Yankee game with my good friend Micheal Robinson last night. The Bombers nearly capped a huge comeback in the bottom of the ninth. Down 6-3 entering the last frame the Yanks pulled the Oakland Athletics to within one run, a 6-5 game.

With the bases loaded and two outs, Nick Swisher skied a long fly ball deep to center, nearly crushing what would have been a game-winning grand slam to win it.

Unfortunately the ball died on the warning track and the game ended. A loss for the Yanks.

Along with thanking Alyssa for her kind words, I want to thank Micheal for taking me to the game and getting such great seats behind the left field wall.

Thanks buddy. Now for the funny story…

I met Micheal at the stadium, as I took the train down. While I was waiting for him to get to 161st St., I sat on a bench outside the Metro North station. A group of kids, probably in their first years of college, congregated around the bench and began talking about the tremor (or earthquake) that occurred yesterday afternoon.

“Did you feel it,” one of them asked his friend.

“No, I was in Rockland and I didn’t feel anything,” his friend replied.

I subconsciously started nodding my head, because I had felt it. I had been napping in the afternoon when all of a sudden my bed started to shake. I had no idea what was happening, because I knew I wasn’t dreaming. I thought back to the scene in the movie “The Exorcist” when the girl’s bed started to violently joggle up and down.

Was the movie coming to life? That was my best guess.

One of the kids asked me where I was, so I told him.

“Westchester County – Yorktown Heights,” I said.

A young lady who was with them said, “Yorktown? Do you know the Scott sisters?”

Unbelievable. The Scott sisters are two young ladies from Yorktown High School that play lacrosse – I covered them several times over the course of the last few months working for the local newspaper. Both of them were seniors this past year and are playing lacrosse at UNC next year.

It turns out the young lady who asked me if I knew them played lacrosse with them.

I love how even at Yankee Stadium they find me; random people that know people I know.

Life is funny. That is my conjecture.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 25 other followers