Results tagged ‘ John Flaherty ’

YES, please!

I have been told in life there are three types of people: those who make it happen, those who watch it happen, and those who wonder what happened.

As a current high school sports reporter and MLBlogger trying to take the next step in his career, I’m at the point where I want to make it happen. And what I have in mind might provide me with that chance.

Recently I was tossing ideas around in my head, thinking of companies to apply to while job hunting, and I somehow managed to venture over to the YES Network’s career page. In the past I’ve checked out the YES Network’s career page, but there was never anything listed. This time was a little different; there was one job posted:

Social Media Specialist.

As soon as I noticed the listing, I jumped on it. I tweaked my resume, pieced together an appropriate, well-written cover letter, and gathered the right material together to apply for the job – the right material basically being proof of all the times YES has used my insight via social media on its TV shows.

On May 8, 2010 YES used a comment I posted on its official Facebook page for the “Extra Innings” postgame show. There were no words to describe my excitement level, seeing my name and comment on TV when it first happened.

Fast forward to April 10, 2011. I wrote in another Facebook comment, and once again YES used my name and my words on “Extra Innings.”

June 9, 2012, same thing.

All of this YES Network social media craze reached new heights on Aug. 6 this year when YES actually used my question during the “YES Network Games,” a contest designed for viewers to tweet in trivia questions with the commentators trying to answer them.

After my name appeared, a few of my friends attempted to stage a Twitter hashtag rally entitled, #HireAJMartelli.

The YES Network should already know (just based on the history) how finely tuned my skills are when it comes to social media. In fact ESPN should also have the same idea, considering two of my comments made it onto the exclusive Baseball Tonight show during the “Chatter Up” segment in 2008 and 2009.

It’s also not as if I’m an uneducated, inexperienced stranger. My past work in other media outside of social media speaks for itself.  If I could show something to the YES Network right now, this would be it; some highlights of my young career:

  • B.S. in journalism from Mercy College (class of 2010) where I served for two years as the sports editor of the Mercy student newspaper. The Mercy student paper won two New York Press Association awards while I served as sports editor, and I was awarded two Quill Awards (2009, ’10) for sports reporting, given to me by Mercy’s media studies department.

  • Went on to cover the 2012 Hudson Valley Renegades this past season. The ‘Gades captured the New York-Penn League Championship, beating the Tri-City Valley Cats. For their successful and winning campaign, the Renegades were voted the 2012 Minor League Baseball team of the year.

 

  • Have worked for the past two years (and continue to work) as a high school sports reporter. To coincide with the Yankee motif, one of my favorite times covering a high school game was sitting next to Bernie Williams, covering his daughter’s basketball game this past February. I even wrote an OP/ED that ran in the paper about how interesting it was, sitting next to a Yankee legend while working.

But I think what puts it all over the top for me is what you’re reading right now. Yankee Yapping has been lauded by MLB. It has been ranked in the top three MLBlogs and featured multiple times; it has garnered a solid amount of fanfare since I launched it in July, 2009.

The bottom line is, I have done a lot of work and paid a lot of dues. And now, if there is a chance to move up the ladder, I’d like to take it.

To anyone reading this with a Twitter page, and would like to help, tweet the link to this blog to @YESNetwork and help #HireAJMartelli.

Together, we can make it happen. Not watch it happen, or wonder what happened.

In the meantime, I have high school ice hockey to cover this weekend after the holiday. And if you were to ask me what I’m thankful for this Thanksgiving, it’s having a job in the print media field, covering sports. No matter what level it happens to be on.

Yankee Bullpen Nickname: You Heard it Here First!

 

The --ianos !!!!

I have given a name to the Yankee bullpen:

“The  -ianos.”

That would be (Pedro) Feliciano, (Rafael) Soriano, and Mariano (Rivera).

Right now I am picturing Michael Kay and the rest of the YES commentators and analysts calling them by this nickname. And somehow, I get the feeling that I’ll be sitting down watching a game and Kay will blurt out to John Flaherty,

“Flash, I just came up with the perfect nickname for the Yankee ‘pen: The  -ianos. It makes perfect sense!”

Then Flaherty will respond with something like,

“Michael, you always come up with these funny names. You are a genius .”

 

I said it first!

Then of course I will become upset, yelling at the TV set about how I came up with it first.

Hopefully the Yankee ‘pen will make some noise next year. Former Yankee reliever Jeff Nelson already said the blueprint for the 2011 Yankee bullpen reminds him of the corps of relief pitchers from the Yankee Dynasty from 1996-2000.

That’s a good sign.

“The  -ianos” will most likely make up the heart of the bullpen and did well for what it was worth in 2010. With the Mets last season Feliciano was 3-6 with a 3.30 ERA, but was able to dominate most lefties. He only gave up eight extra base hits to hitters batting from the left side of the plate. They only hit .211 against him and he allowed no home runs to left-handed hitters in 92 appearances.

That kind of brilliance will be used to counter David Ortiz and the rest of the A.L. power lefties.

Soriano, as most people know, agreed to a three-year deal with the Yankees last Thursday. The 31 year-old flame-throwing righty will be the eight inning man in the absence of Kerry Wood, who returned to the Chicago Cubs. Soriano led the A.L. in saves last year with 45 for the Tampa Bay Rays.

According to several reports, the decision to sign Soriano was not the decision of Yankee General Manager Brian Cashman. In fact, he was not happy the deal went down, probably because the Yankees paid around $35 million for him and lost their number one draft pick.

Today Soriano was introduced at Yankee Stadium in a press conference and had an apparent exchange with the Yanks’ GM.


Cashman looks thrilled. 

One source said Cashman’s conversation with Soriano went something like this:

Soriano: “I’m happy to be a Yankee.”

Cashman: “And we’re happy that you’re a Yankee, too. Although I’d personally be happy with other players instead.”

That would make me terribly uncomfortable.

In any event, Soriano is a Yankee. And he best live up to his contract, or else Cashman will be standing in front of all the executives who pushed for Soriano, smiling and saying, “I told you so.”

Rounding out “The -ianos” is who else but the Sandman, Mariano Rivera. There’s really no need to even go into detail about Rivera’s capability. He is a legend. Last year he picked up 33 saves and boasted a trim ERA of 1.80. He signed a two-year deal this off-season, meaning the Yankees will be treated to his services for at least another two seasons.

Mo is Mo and I expect another solid year from him.

With the bullpen pieces in place, the Yankee relievers should make life easier for the starters. But just remember, if Kay, Flaherty, or anyone else for that matter calls them “The -ianos” and says it’s their idea…

No no no.

You heard it at Yankee Yapping first.

My Summer was Baseball

My summer....

If I could sum up my summer in one word it would be baseball. Then again, if I could sum up my existence in one word, it would probably be baseball.

Now that the summer is over and school is back in session (for most of us, but not all of us–I graduated college!) I thought I would reflect on everything that was special about this summer. Never in my life have I ever spent a summer that involved the sport of baseball so much. Here are a few reasons baseball has dominated my life for the past three months.

Yankee Games

 

Yankee games = FUN summer!What would a summer be without a few visits to Yankee Stadium to see the Yanks play? Well, it would be a very dull and sad summer. Thankfully that was not the case, as I was able to attend three Yankee games over the vacation.

 

Yanks/Phils on my birthdayThe first game I went to was on June 15, my 23rd birthday; a World Series rematch with the Philadelphia Phillies, in which the Yankees won 8-3. When I walked into the Stadium that night I remember thinking to myself, “The last time the Yanks and Phillies met at this ballpark, the Yanks hoisted the 2009 World Series trophy over their heads.” I felt very lucky to be at that game.

 

Yanks/Mets five days laterFive days later I made another trip to the big ballpark in the Bronx for the rubber game of the Subway Series. Yankees vs. Mets; CC Sabathia vs. Johan Santana; it doesn’t get any better than that. Mark Teixeira made it a special day by clubbing a grand slam home run, the only offense on the afternoon. The Bombers went on to beat their cross-town rivals 4-0.

 

First time in the new Monument Park

I once again experienced the thrill of Yankee Stadium on Aug. 18 when the Yankees played the Tigers. For the first time I got into Monument Park in the new house and it was nice to see Johnny Damon make his return to the Bronx–as a Tiger. The Yanks won, 9-5. Plus, before the game we got very close to the field. We could practically reach out and touch Joba Chamberlain!

Joba was so close to us! 

All of these games of course were over the summer. I also attended Opening Day, which was a great way to kick off my baseball summer.

The Yankees were 4-0 at games I went to this year and they are 8-0 at games I have been to in the new Yankee Stadium. My only hope is that they keep winning whenever I go to see them.

 

Trip to Cooperstown

 

Cooperstown was awesome

 

I don’t want to say this experience changed me at all, but in a way it did. On July 3, my friends and I took a day trip up to Cooperstown, N.Y. to visit the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.

I have already written about everything that happened that day, so I won’t re-hash every little detail of the trip. Yet, I will say that the trip increased not only my appreciation for the sport of baseball, but my love for the sport as well.

It was almost as if I was whisked back to the past; Cooperstown provides such a rich history and gives you an old-time feel.


Memories. 

What’s more, as a huge Yankee fan, it relieved me to see that about 80% of the museum was filled with Yankee memorabilia and historic artifacts. Everything from World Series rings and trophies to Babe Ruth’s jersey was on display for all to see.

Every baseball fan needs (and I stress the word NEEDS) to go to Cooperstown at least once in their life. If you do not go, you are truly missing out and history and quite possibly a life-changing experience.

 

Hudson Valley Renegades

 


A great experience; a step in the right direction.Working for a minor league baseball team all summer certainly played a huge part in how much I was involved with the sport of baseball this summer.
I have shared several stories about things I have done, players I have spoken to, and how much fun it was to get to know my coworkers.

The ‘Gades’ season ended on Sunday and it was a great way to go out: a win over the Lowell Spinners, who are a farm team affiliated with the Boston Red Sox. The Renegades finished with a winning record of 39-36 and it was pretty cool that I got to be a part of their family for the summer.

As it turns out, Rick Zolzer, one of the main bosses from the organization, took notice of “Yankee Yapping” and now wants me to take over the Renegades blogging. He also knows some writers at MLB.com and he said he would mention me to them, which makes me really happy; I would be ecstatic to get my foot in MLB.com’s door. After all, writing and working for them is my ultimate goal.

Working for the Renegades will undoubtedly pay dividends for me.

 

Interview with Brian Sweeney

 

Brian Sweeney and I graduated from the same college!

One of the best things about this summer was actually talking to an active player on an MLB team. Brian Sweeney of the Seattle Mariners talked to me about his life, his background, and his family; he shared some great stories with me and I feel truly blessed that I was able to conduct an interview with him.

I’ll always remember what Sweeney said when I called him to conduct the interview: “Sure we can do the interview now…as long as it doesn’t go longer than about an hour because I have to head over to SafeCo for the game.”   

In awe, I had three words in response: “Wow, that’s awesome.”

The way he said it just left me amazed. He just said it so “matter-of-factly,” if you will.

Sweeney became the first active MLB player I have ever interviewed. I interviewed and wrote a story on John Flaherty last year, but he is retired and now a broadcaster on the YES Network. It was a bit different, considering Sweeney is still playing and he pitched at Yankee Stadium this summer.

What also made it special was that Sweeney and I graduated from the same college. It was nice to discuss what our experiences were like at Mercy, and we were able to relate to one another through that common achievement.  

Hopefully Sweeney is not the last MLB player I interview. I’m hoping for a lot more where that came from.

Now that the summer is over, there is still more baseball to look forward to. The Yankees are playing for their postseason lives and need to pick things up. 1-5 in their last six games is not a good sign, but they can pick up the slack and regain their livelihood.

Tonight CC Sabathia toes the rubber against the Tampa Bay Rays in hopes of playing the role of “stopper.”

The Yankee ace is also looking for his 20th win of 2010.

You Know You’re a REAL Yankee Fan When…

 

Big Game James beat us yesterday

 

Yesterday the New York Yankees dropped the rubber game of a three game series against the Tampa Bay Rays, a 3-0 shutout at the hands of “Big Game” James Shields. 7 1/3 innings, no runs, four hits, one walk, and 11 strikeouts later, the Yankees lose.

 

The Bronx Bombers’ lead over Tampa Bay in the American League Eastern Division is now only one game, signifying a likely “two horse race” down the stretch run and into September. The Yanks and Rays own the two best records in the majors and both teams can and probably will make the playoffs.

 

While the Yanks lost, their cross-town rivals, the New York Mets, were beaten 14-1 by the National League West’s worst team, the Arizona Diamondbacks.

 

Mets lost too 

 

Ed, one of my close friends from high school who happens to be a devout Mets fan, proclaimed his disgust at the team and how poor their play has recently been. I suggested to him that he switch sides, and I said he should become a Yankee fan.

 

“Come to the good side, and soon you’ll be having dreams of pinstripes, strong, winning seasons, and World Series Championships.”

 

Ed responded, “Oh, you mean the dark side? I think I’ll trust the force and try to will the Mets to victory!”

 

I have to tip my cap to him. He is a true fan. Even when I tempted him, which (to him) must have been like the Devil tempting Jesus Christ, he stood by his team. He has been a Mets fan his whole life and he will never disrespect his loyalty to his favorite team.

 

The whole exchange with Ed got me thinking…what makes a real fan, and more particularly, what makes a true Yankee fan?

 

Here are some ways (that I came up with) to tell if you are a REAL Yankee fan.

 

You know you’re a REAL Yankee fan when…

 

You (at least try) to watch every game

 

 


Real fans watch ALL the games. 

Let’s face it: following the team religiously is an important aspect of being a true fan.

 

The best part of my night during the baseball season is tuning into the YES Network and enjoying a Yankee game. Things can get difficult with work and in recent years school, and sometimes I am not able to watch every inning. But rest assured, even when I can’t watch the games, I constantly check my phone for updates, box scores, and stats.

 

Even when I can’t physically see what’s happening, I know what’s happening.

 

What really annoyed me last year were all the “Yankee fans” who watched maybe 30 innings during the regular season celebrate the World Series victory, as if they followed the team throughout the year. They probably only knew the key players, like Derek Jeter and Alex Rodriguez.

 

Which leads into my next point…

 

 

You know all of the Yankee players, even the most obscure ones

 

 


If you know these guys, you're a REAL fan 

Everyone knows the brand name players, like Jeter, Rodriguez, Mark Teixeira, and Mariano Rivera. They are the faces of the Yankees organization and can easily be recognized by even the most distant Yankee fan. Any person who claims to be a Yankee fan can tell you who these players are.

 

But what about Ramiro Pena or Colin Curtis? David Robertson and Alfredo Aceves?

 

If you ask a Yankee fan who these players are and they have no idea, then there is no way they are a real fan. Knowledge of every player–even the lesser-known ones–is a must in terms of being a real Yankee fan.

 

And it doesn’t just mean lesser-known players from this year.

 

For example, back in 2005, the Yanks had two starting pitchers to fill in for a banged up rotation; one by the name of Aaron Small the other by the name of Shawn Chacon. Combined, these hurlers went 17-3 and helped lead the Yankees to the A.L. East title, which they won on the second-to-last day of the ’05 season.

 

Any real Yankee fan would and very well should know that.

 

 

You own a decent amount of Yankee Memorabilia

 

 


A very small sample of my Yankee collection 

Support of the team is important. One of the best ways to show your allegiance, if not the best, is wear your team’s colors with pride. I, for one, wear a Yankee necklace which I only take off before I shower.

 

I also own a wide variety of Yankee merchandise, including seven pinstripe jerseys, hats, pennants, bobble heads, framed photos…you name it, I probably have it. Come to think of it, a friend actually once asked me if I own any other clothing that doesn’t have an interlocking NY on it.

 

Although it doesn’t seem like it, I do have clothes that are not Yankee related.

 

I am not saying a real Yankee fan has to be as hardcore about it as I am; I am a special case! But the fact is that a real Yankee fan will, at least once in awhile, wear a Yankee shirt or a Yankee hat.

 

There is no way (in good conscience) a real Yankee fan can’t wear a Yankee shirt once in awhile.  

 

 

You know the history between the Yankees and the Boston Red Sox

 

 


Yankees/Red Sox...biggest rivalry in sports 

With every great team comes a great adversary.

 

For as long as there has been baseball, there has been a heated rivalry between the Yankees and Red Sox. There have been brutal fights, players who have switched sides, and countless numbers of classic games played between the two teams.

 

In my lifetime, there are two games between the Yankees and Red Sox that stand out as being the absolute greatest. The first was on July 1, 2004. Both teams left everything they had on the diamond, as evidenced by Jeter’s effort diving into the stands to make a play. The Red Sox were trying to avoid a three game sweep and the Yankees were trying to complete the sweep.

 

Neither team wanted to lose.

 

The Red Sox took a 4-3 the lead in the top of the 13th inning, setting up an improbable comeback win for the Yanks in the bottom of the frame. Miguel Cairo doubled to score Ruben Sierra (again, going back to the idea of knowing who the obscure players are) to tie the game, and John Flaherty (who now works for the YES Network) drove in the winning run to give the Yankees a win.

 

 


Flaherty wins it! 

What a game. I’ll never forget it.

 

The second all-time best Yankees-Red Sox battle (for me) was Oct. 16, 2003–Game Seven of the 2003 American League Championship Series. The ALCS was knotted at three games apiece, and the Yanks and BoSox went through hell to get to the final game.

 

The winner of Game Seven was given a one-way ticket to the World Series, the loser was going home.

 

Boston looked to be in complete command of everything in the fourth inning. They had jumped out to a 4-0 lead and knocked Yankees’ starter Roger Clemens out of the game. Jason Giambi cut into the Red Sox lead with two solo home runs, but David Ortiz smacked a long ball of his own, giving the BoSox a 5-2 edge heading into the bottom of the eighth inning.

 

I watched that game at home, biting my fingernails and trembling in fear. I thought the Yankees were doomed. My thought process in the middle of the eighth inning was, “The Yankees would be the ones walking back in shame and the Red Sox were going to the World Series.”

 

But the Empire struck back in the bottom of the frame.

 

Jeter doubled. Bernie Williams singled. Hideki Matsui doubled. Jorge Posada blooped a single to center field. Just like that, the game was tied. It was the best comeback and by far the most unbelievable game I had ever seen–and it wasn’t even over yet!

 

Boston, five defensive outs from embarrassing the Yankees, blew the lead and they headed into extras.

 

In the bottom of the 11th inning Aaron Boone was due up first. I remember thinking to myself, “He’s not going to do anything. He isn’t a power hitter.” But Alfonso Soriano and Derek Jeter were due up after Boone, and I prayed one of them would at least get on base.

 

 


What a moment. 

My thoughts were soon proven wrong, as Boone came up and hammered the first pitch he saw for a game-winning home run to win the A.L. Pennant for the Yankees. It was the most glorious home run I had ever seen and one of the most meaningful; very rarely will you ever see a walk-off home run to cap off a game of that magnitude.

 

“There’s a fly ball deep to left! It’s on its way! There it goes…AND THE YANKEES ARE GOING TO THE WORLD SERIES! AARON BOONE HAS HIT A HOME RUN!”

 

Those words still resonate with me to this day.  

 

There are plenty of other games and moments in Yankee-Red Sox history. But those two stand out as my favorites. If you are a real Yankee fan, you can recollect moments from the rivalry as vividly I have.

 

 

 

You know about the Yankee Stadium Regulars

 

 


Bald Vinny! 

At Yankee Stadium, the home of the New York Yankees since 1923…well, 2009 if you count the new Stadium…in any case, the Bronx is where Yankees play. If you go to a Yankee game, there are certain traditions and loyalists who are always at the ballpark to root for the Yanks.

 

The most loyal fan I can really think of is Vinny Milano, A.K.A. “Bald Vinny” of the right field Bleacher Creatures. He conjures up all the fans in the right field bleachers and leads them in a roll call right after the first pitch of the game is thrown. They yell out to every Yankee on the field until they are given some sort of acknowledgment, whether it is a pose or wave.

 

The roll call has become a staple of Yankee Stadium, and the real Yankee fans know about Bald Vinny and how important he has become to Yankee Stadium.

 

 


Freddy Sez 

Another Stadium regular is Freddy Schumann, an older fan who is commonly known as “Freddy Sez.” He walks around Yankee Stadium with a pan painted with a four-leaf clover on it. Attached to the pan is generally a sign that has some sort of encouraging words on it directed at the Yankees.

 

Freddy also carries a spoon, which is used to bang on the pan. The sound of the spoon on the pan makes a distinctive noise which can be heard throughout the whole Stadium. He always allows the fans around him to bang on the pan, in attempt to stimulate a Yankee rally.

 

Bald Vinny and Freddy Sez are the number one Yankee fans I know. If you don’t know them, you really don’t know the Yankees very well, or at least not Yankee Stadium.

 

And the last and probably most important part of being a real Yankee fan…

 

 

You Know Your Yankee History

 

 


History lesson 

Knowledge is power.

 

If you are a real Yankee fan, you know the background on the team. Everyone knows they are the winningest team in sports history with 27 World Titles. But do they know how many times the Yankees have been to the World Series? Do they know which Yankee player has the most World Series rings? Do they know all the retired numbers?

 

Only true fans know that the Yankees have been to the World Series 40 times, Yogi Berra has the most World Series titles as a Yankee (with 10) and there are 16 retired numbers–I can name them all, right off the top of my head.

 

But naming them all is much too vulgar a display of Yankee intelligence.

 

 


Retired numbers 

 

Knowing the background of the players is just as important as knowing the background of the team. There are many ways to learn about each player. Interviews, Yankeeography documentaries, and feature stories in sports magazines are probably the easiest ways to increase knowledge about players.

 

For instance, I read a story about former Yankee ace Chien-Ming Wang in Sports Illustrated a couple of years ago. By reading that feature story, I found out Wang learned his sinker from the Yankees went he came over from Taiwan. One of his pitching coaches in the minor leagues showed him how to hold the ball, and from there he was able to shut the opposition down.

 

He worked his way up and became the number one Yankee starter.

 

 


Chien-Ming Wang's journey through baseball has been documented 

Yet Wang’s pitching style wasn’t the only thing I learned about from that story. I learned about his life. According to the article, he is (or at least at the time was) revered as Taiwan’s number one athlete; he is a superstar over there. He could not even walk down the street without getting mobbed by legions of fans.

 

But when he walked down the street in New York City, he was hardly recognized. He felt there was less pressure on him in New York, and that is why he opted to stay there instead of going back to pitch in his native land. That also explains why he was so relaxed as a member of the Yanks and never looked rattled or uneasy when he pitched.

 

The article on Wang is a perfect example of how to learn about players in an easy way. It was an informative article, pointing out a lot of “You may have not known, but now you do” facts about his life and career.

 

If you are a real Yankee fan, learning about the players is equally as important as team history.

 

 

 

 

Real Yankees fans rule. Bandwagoners suck.

 

These are merely a few ways to tell if you are a real Yankee fan. Bandwagon fans can always be told apart from the hardcore ones, simply by conversation. If you talk to someone who claims to be a Yankee fan (or a fan of anything, for that matter) and has no idea about key aspects of the team, then, in my eyes, they aren’t true fans.

 

I tend to respect the true fans more than those who just root the Yankees on when they win, a la last fall. It’s easier to respect true fans’ opinions when they have more knowledge and follow the team closely. It’s also easier to hold a conversation with the real fans than the bandwagon fans.

 

Nothing annoys me more when I hear people give me false Yankee info.

 

The bottom line is that if you are going to be a Yankee fan, be a real fan. Watch more than 30 innings a year, know about the players, and know about the Stadium. Know what the Yankees-Red Sox rivalry means and wear a Yankee hat once in awhile, in undying support of your favorite baseball team.

 

If you want to be a real fan, then KNOW the Yankees. And if you don’t know them, then don’t act like you do.    

Believe: An Interview With Seattle Mariners’ Reliever Brian Sweeney

 

Brian Sweeney and I graduated from the same college!

 

Believe. It’s a motto Seattle Mariners’ reliever Brian Sweeney goes by. Believe in yourself, believe in God, just believe and you will be fine.

 

On July 1, Sweeney, a native of Yonkers, N.Y., pitched at Yankee Stadium; a scoreless, 1-2-3 inning in which he got Ramiro Pena, Brett Gardner, and Derek Jeter out. He later went on to face the Yanks on July 11 in Seattle and got the likes of Alex Rodriguez, Mark Teixeira, and Nick Swisher out. At press time, Sweeney is 1-1 with a 3.68 ERA.

 

But his story begins long before facing the Bronx Bombers. Sweeney recently talked to Yankee Yapping about his journey through baseball, where he learned his knee-buckling changeup, and how he was punk’d the night before he was called up to the big leagues.

 

Yankee Yapping: You started at Archbishop Stepinac High School, and then moved on to Mercy College. Could you describe what it was like to pitch for the Flyers (now known as the Mavericks) and what did you major in while you were there?

 

Brian Sweeney: Pitching for Mercy was an incredible learning experience.  I learned about hard work, dedication and how important it was to not give in, no matter what the circumstance.  

 

Our records each season were not very good but it was not for lack of effort. I learned how to lose which is an important aspect in my professional life.  

 

Learning how to lose helped me want to win more!

 

We lost off the field as well, because our assistant coach passed away in a car accident my freshman year. I also learned my changeup from my head coach at Mercy that I still use today.

My major was biology. 

 

 

 

Mercy alumn can go on to do great things..hope I fall into that category. 

 

YY: Growing up, was there any specific team or player you looked up to?

 

BS: I was a Yankee fan growing up and my idol was Don Mattingly.

 

 

 

YY: You made your MLB debut for the Seattle Mariners on Aug. 16, 2003. What was your initial reaction when you got the call to the show?

 

BS: There was an unbelievable feeling of satisfaction. I knew from when I was four years old that I wanted to be a professional baseball player. Granted I wanted to play shortstop for the Yankees, but after seven years of work in the minor leagues, I have finally accomplished my goal of getting to the big leagues.  

 

People spend seven years in school to become doctors and lawyers, but I would certainly say my schooling helped me become a big league baseball player.

 

 

 

YY: After you spent a year with the Mariners, you went to San Diego to pitch for the Padres. What was the move like, going from the American League to the National League?

 

BS: The move wasn’t a big deal, except I wanted to stay with the Mariners my whole career. They brought me up and I wanted to pay dividends for them. I guess I can do that now that I’m back in Seattle. Both San Diego and Seattle are classy organizations. I only wish they were closer to home for me and my family, though!

 

 

Brian pitched for the Padres in 2004 

 

 

YY: On May 7, 2006, you earned your first career save in a 6-3 Padres’ victory over the Chicago Cubs. As a relief pitcher, how did that feel and would you rather have a win or a save?

 

BS: It was a pretty cool experience considering our closer was Trevor Hoffman. He had pitched, like, five days in a row and he had the day off so they put me in the closer role that day.  Everybody in the stands expected Hoffy to run out of the bullpen, but they got me that day.  

 

All things winning are good, so I prefer both.

 

 

 


The drills are different in Japan 

 

YY: At the end of ’06 you made your way to Japan and pitched for the Nippon-Ham Fighters. The story in the Journal News said, “You could go on all day about the differences between pitching in Japan and the United States.” Is there anything that you miss about Japan, now that you’re back in the States?

 

BS: I miss some of the drills that were conducted over there. For instance, they would put the pitchers at shortstop and it really was a great workout. I also miss some of my teammates. I played with Yu Darvish, who is an excellent player and a classy individual. Overall, it was a lot of fun to play in Japan.

 

I would also say I miss the food there. It was tremendous!

 

 

 

YY: This past April you came back, signed a deal with the Mariners, and then you were sent to the minors. Exactly two months later you were back in the majors. How did it feel to be back, considering you went right back to where you started (in Seattle) Was it a kind of homecoming for you? How happy were your teammates for you?

 

BS:  It felt like I was in a time machine. All I could say was, “Where am I?”

 

Coming back and getting called up was satisfying, especially since I was able to go back to the Mariners–the team that bred me for seven years. It was like a homecoming, but I also had to get to know a lot of my teammates.

 

The only one I really knew from my first stint with the Mariners was Ichiro. It was fun to catch up with him and we talked a lot about Japan. It was a learning process to get to know the rest of the players. It took some time, but I got to know them all.

 

 

 

Believe. 

 

YY:  Recently on July 1, you pitched at Yankee Stadium–a scoreless, 1-2-3 7th inning in which you got Ramiro Pena, Brett Gardner, and the legendary Derek Jeter out.

 

Your family was there, holding signs that read “believe” on them. Could you maybe give me the story behind that, and what did it feel like to be pitching at Yankee Stadium against its most beloved player? Did you change your pitching approach when Jeter stepped into the box?

 

BS: Believe is a word my children use (they are 11 and 6). It’s a strong word that means a lot and it pays dividends over time; believe in yourself, believe in God. My family jumped on that. They made signs that read “Believe” on them and it was meaningful to me that they did that.

 

I later found out that the Mariners’ team expression is “Believe Big.” It’s just a positive word.

 

As for Jeter…

 

I did the same thing with him that I did with the other hitters; same approach. Obviously he is one of the most celebrated ballplayers on the Yankees and he was a nice challenge.

 

The only thing that was different about him was that he took a long time to get into the batter’s box. I wish he had gotten into the box a little faster! Maybe he was trying to slow me down? It could just be his routine.

 

 


On July 1, Brian pitched against Derek Jeter at Yankee Stadium 

 

 

YY: At the moment your career record is 4-1. Of those four wins, which one would you say (if you can) was the most memorable, or rewarding?

 

BS: My first win was certainly the most rewarding. On June 29, 2004, San Diego needed a starter to face the Arizona Diamondbacks–and not just the D’Backs, but Randy Johnson.

 

Johnson had 3,992 career strikeouts and was going for 4,000. In that game, he got to 4,000 and I was two of them; I had to hit against him because it’s the N.L. We did however win the game 3-2 and it was a great feeling.

 

The next day I actually met Randy and talked to him, which also made it memorable.

 

 

 

YY: What’s the best story you have from being an MLB pitcher? When I interviewed John Flaherty (a former MLB catcher) he said he was hung over the day he was called up to the majors. Do you have a story like that?

 

BS: Oh brother! I know John very well and it’s pretty funny that he was hung over when he was called up! I have a story like that…

 

The night before I was called up I was out with a longtime roommate of mine. We had a few beers and then Jim Slaton, one of the coaches said, “I’m fired because the team isn’t pitching well.” I didn’t take it very well and had some choice words.

 

Finally he stopped me and said, “Just kidding. You’re going to the big leagues tomorrow.” I practically passed out; all the work I put in had finally paid off.

 

I was so happy, but I couldn’t get in touch with my dad right away because of the massive blackout that hit the east coast in the summer of 2003. I wanted my dad to be the first to know, because he was and still is a huge part of my success.

So Much to Say!

There has been so much going on lately!

 

Instead of writing a whole bunch of different blog entries, I decided to write a little different this time–just for this time, since there are so many topics I want to cover.

 

First things first…

 

 


Godspeed, Shepp. You will truly be missed!! 

  • We lost a legend today. Bob Sheppard, at the age of 99, passed away. I put this

loss up there with losing Mickey Mantle and Joe DiMaggio in 1995 and 1999, respectively.

 

Sheppard was the voice of Yankee Stadium for over 50 years and life will just not be the same without him; it hasn’t been, ever since he stopped announcing games at Yankee Stadium in 2007. He officially retired back in November.

 

Mr. Sheppard, you will ALWAYS be remembered as a classy, dignified, and honorable man. They say true legends will live forever, and you will certainly live forever in the minds of the Yankee fans.

 

“I have one style of speaking. It’s the same, whether it be at Yankee Stadium, at home, in the classroom, or when I lector at Mass.“–Bob Sheppard.

 

 

 

  • I have been especially busy this week at my job with the Hudson Valley Renegades. After a walk-off win on Friday night, we were beaten on Saturday night at the hands of the Auburn Doubledays.

 

Although we lost, there was a little ceremony before the game that really made me think. At Dutchess Stadium, there is a Scout’s Hall of Fame; a place dedicated to honor important people who helped recruit players.

 

Scout Hall of Fame induction 

 

Last night the Renegades honored Bob Miske, a scout who worked for the Yankees and the Los Angeles Dodgers, among other organizations. He told a cool story about Tommy Lasorda for his induction speech, and how he became friends with him.

 

Yet before he spoke, an excellent point was brought up: why is there no Scout’s Wing to the National Baseball Hall of Fame? Of course all the legendary players and great writers are enshrined in Cooperstown, but where is the recognition for the people who pick out the young players who go on to become larger-than-life superstars?

 

It’s a great point. When you think about it, someone picked Derek Jeter and Alex Rodriguez out of a ton of other players. From there, they went on to become who they are today. Shouldn’t the person who discovered them get some credit?

 

I think they should.

 

The baseball scouts also dedicate their lives to the business. They travel around the country going to high school and college baseball games with nothing but a book, a pen, and a radar gun, looking for the next top player. Since they dedicate such a big part of their lives to the game, they should certainly be recognized for it.

 

Congratulations to Miske on being honored by the Renegades. We appreciate your effort.

 

Also on a side note, Renegades’ manager Jared Sandberg (who I recently found out is Hall of Famer Ryne Sandberg’s nephew) was standing right next to me during the ceremony…I snapped a picture of him via my camera phone very discreetly before it ended.

 

Jared Sandberg was standing right next to me during the ceremony! haha. 

 

 

  • How nice has CC Sabathia been? His victory over the Seattle Mariners today marked his eighth win in as many opportunities.

 

The Yankee ace has a total of 12 wins this season and only three losses. He is traditionally known as a “second half player,” meaning he usually puts up his best work in the second half of the season after the All-Star break. It’s pretty scary to think how many wins he could potentially reach if he keeps winning the way he is.

 

 


CC Sabathia has been AWESOME this year 

I’m not necessarily saying he’ll win another 12 games over the second half of the year and reach a mind-numbing 24 wins, but 20-21 wins is certainly looking possible at press time. As far as the Cy Young Award goes, it could be him. David Price certainly has a little bit of an edge halfway through the season, but as I said if Sabathia keeps going the way he is, he’s a definite candidate.

 

It’s great to have an ace/horse like him on our side. If his good friend Cliff Lee had become a Yankee (as it looked like he was going to be on Friday) it would have been VERY scary; to have two number one pitchers like Lee and Sabathia on the same team is frightening. To have them on the same team that already has the best record in baseball, is just plain terrifying.

 

But of course the Lee deal fell through and he went to the Texas Rangers. But wait until next year. The Rangers are never going to be able to pay him after this year and it’s quite possible Lee will be in pinstripes in 2011.

 

As for Sabathia, it’s just business as usual. He is slated to pitch again on Friday vs. Tampa Bay at home. If he wins that game, it’s pretty much a given that he’ll at least reach 20 wins this season.

 

 

  • In the fifth inning of today’s game Marcus Thames crushed his third homer of the year, a long shot high off the foul pole in Seattle.

 

It was kind of a bittersweet home run for me.

 

Brian Sweeney and I graduated from the same college! 

 

Thames hit that home run off Brian Sweeney, a fellow alumnus of my alma mater Mercy College and a journeyman pitcher from Yonkers, N.Y. I recently had the chance to talk to Sweeney, and he agreed to do an interview with me for the blog. (He is such a nice guy, by the way!)

 

Sweeney also pitched on Thursday night; he got Jorge Posada to bounce into a double play and got through the eighth inning without giving up an earned run. I’ll admit I was rooting for him. I wanted him to get the Yankees out. After he surrendered the homer to Thames today, he got Jeter, Mark Teixeira, Nick Swisher, and Rodriguez out.

 

He gave up two runs in the fifth but went 1-2-3 in the sixth. I was proud.

 

To me, Sweeney serves as an inspiration. He has made me realize that graduates of my college CAN really go on to do great things. I sometimes have very little faith in myself, especially now considering I’m a recent college graduate struggling to find a real job (I like working for the Renegades, but it’s an internship; it’s going to be over by the end of the summer).

 

But I look at Sweeney, pitching for a Major League Baseball team. He came from the same place I did and has reached a great place in life. It gives me hope and encouragement and makes me believe that I can do something great with myself, if I work hard enough.

 

Mercy alumn can go on to do great things..hope I fall into that category. 

 

When I heard John Flaherty mention Mercy College on the YES Network this afternoon and on Thursday night, it made me smile; it made me very proud. It also made me wonder if Flaherty would mention when he visited Mercy last year; I interviewed him and wrote a feature article about him when he came, as I was the sports editor of the school paper.

 

It was, by far, my favorite story that I wrote in college.

 

I’m actually still trying to get in touch with Flaherty; I’d like to send him the story I wrote on him. Unfortunately, I can’t find a way to get in touch with him at the moment. I’ll keep trying though and eventually I’ll get a hold of him. I’d like for him to see all the nice things I wrote about him.

 

As for Sweeney: I am proud of him, and I’m sure the rest of the Mercy College community is, too. I’ll be talking to him soon and when I get my interview with him, it’ll be posted here right away!

 

 

Lastly, I’d like to thank my good friend Micheal Robinson for coming up with a new picture for the Yankee Yapping Facebook page. He is a wonderfully skilled person when it comes to graphic design and he is a genius with photo-shop.

 

Yankee Yapping new logo 

 

It looks great, buddy. I love it and thank you once again!

Graduation

 

 

Graduation is tomorrow!

In less than 24 hours I will officially be ending (what seems like) a pretty long and important chapter in my life. I will be graduating from Mercy College Wednesday morning.

 

Over the past couple of days I have been reflecting on what life has been like for the time I spent in college. There have been a lot experiences and different things I have been able to do. Some semesters were better than others, some good and some not as good. I can say I had many good times and just as many difficult times.

 

But as Derek Jeter once said, “You find out a lot about yourself when dealing with adversity.” The Yankee captain couldn’t have been more right. I did learn a lot about myself through difficult times.

 

I think the busiest semester had to be last spring, or the spring of 2009. There was a lot going on at the time, both good and bad. One of the good parts about that semester was the weekend of March 13. I had a cool story to cover (and a date with the girl I liked at the time the next day…but that’s another story for another time!)

 

That Friday, former New York Yankee catcher and current YES Network broadcaster John Flaherty was the guest of honor at a fundraiser breakfast my college’s softball team hosted. As the sports editor of the school newspaper, my job was to cover the event and write an article about it.

 

Cover an event and talk to an ex-Yankee? Yeah, I was up for it! (Please don’t laugh at the picture; it was REALLY early in the morning…I am NOT a morning person!)

 

 

I met John Flaherty in the spring of 2008 

After the breakfast was over, Flaherty spoke to us about his career and what it was like playing for the Yankees. He told some great stories and encouraged the Mercy teams to enjoy their time together as friends and teammates.

 

Probably the best story Flaherty told was how he got called up to the majors. He mentioned that he and his friends had gone out for “sodas” the night before and his first day on the job in the majors he felt a little…hung-over.

 

I asked him what it felt like to be in the Major Leagues, seeing as how it’s every little boy’s dream to be there. He said aside from being hung-over that it was a whirlwind; it took awhile for it to sink in that he was a major leaguer. He even said he didn’t believe it until Kirk Gibson told him he was not going back to the minors.

 

 


Flash! 

Flaherty said his favorite Yankee teammate was Jorge Posada and that he still keeps in touch with him to this day. Well, I guess working for YES and just being a former Yankee, he can probably pretty much keep in touch with all of the current Yankees.

 

There were also some things Flaherty talked about that day which took me by surprise. First off, until then I had no idea he was originally drafted in the 25th round by the Boston Red Sox. Long before he swung his bat and beat the BoSox on July 1, 2004, he was a member of the Red Sox.

 

Another thing he spoke about was how he almost passed on being a Yankee. The Texas Rangers called him and they wanted him to be their everyday catcher. When he realized the deal with Texas was not going to work out, he had to call Brian Cashman back and tell him he wanted in.

 

He came to Spring Training in 2003 as a non-roster invitee and ultimately made the team.

 

One last thing he said (that I didn’t even think of until he mentioned it) was the 2003 World Series, which the Yankees played in against the Florida Marlins. “Even though we didn’t win, it felt good to be there,” Flaherty said. “There really is nothing like playing in the fall classic.”

 

After it was all over, Flaherty took a picture (above) with me and signed a ball for me.

 

The ball he signed for me 

 

He was very friendly and overall I feel it was one of the better and more interesting articles I wrote as sports editor of the school newspaper. I put a lot of hard work into that article.

 

 


This was the article I wrote on Flaherty 

I can pretty much say that was one of the best experiences I have ever had in college. It was just a perfect weekend; everything that happened meant a lot to me and it’ll be a memory I’ll carry with myself for the rest of my life.

 

There were good times, bad times, easy times, and difficult times. Ups and downs, lefts and rights. But looking back, I probably would not have changed anything. I feel I worked as hard as I possibly could and tomorrow I will get what I went to college for; reach the proverbial light at the end of the tunnel and receive my Bachelor’s degree.

 

I’d just like to take this time now and thank everyone who helped me along the way; my family and my friends. They all believed in me, even in times when I really didn’t believe in myself.

 

I’d especially like to thank all my friends from Mercy at the newspaper (Perrota, John, Kevin, Jenn, Ashley, Kristina, Katie, Shedeiky, Sean, Paul, Bloomy…and everyone else, there’s too many to list!) I’ll never forget meeting every week to discuss story ideas, learn about new things in terms of how to write articles, and of course laughing at all the jokes we cracked in between work.

 

Lastly I’d like to thank the loyal readers of this blog. I started Yankee Yapping last summer and I honestly never thought it would even go as far as it has. It has been the featured blog on the MLBlogs page and has amassed over 600 fans on Facebook.

 

So to all you readers, THANK YOU! I really appreciate you taking the time to read my blog and your kind words are truly encouraging.

 

Thank you, Everyone!!!!! :) 

 

Tomorrow is the big day; wish me luck everyone. I am nervous, which kind of strikes me; the day I graduated High School I was not nervous at all. In fact, I could not have been more thrilled to be leaving. But even right now I have butterflies in my stomach and I am a little saddened that college is over.

 

As for the Yankees: well, hopefully they learn how to hit the ball again and beat the Minnesota Twins tonight. This losing nonsense is getting quite ridiculous!

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