Results tagged ‘ God ’

Something You Probably Didn’t Know About Mark Teixeira…

This afternoon the New York Yankees topped the Minnesota Twins for the second straight game, beating them by a score of 7-1. Dating back to 2009, the Yanks are now 12-0 in their last 12 games against the Twins and going all the way back to 2002, the Twins are 3-25 in the Bronx.

 

That’s ownership at its finest.

 

 


Mark Teixeira hit a BOMB today! 

With the Yanks leading 3-0 in the bottom of the seventh inning, Mark Teixeira absolutely murdered a pitch off Minnesota reliever Jesse Crain, a ball crushed deep to right field. The ball landed in a luxury suite below the last tier of the ballpark.

 

Teixeira became the first person to hit the ball anywhere near the third level of the new Yankee Stadium.

 

That…was a bomb!

 

Last season, Jorge Posada hit a towering homer that many thought might reach the upper deck. The ball fell short of the grandstands. When he was questioned after the game about whether or not he thought the ball would reach the upper level, Posada had one thing to say:

 

“Teixeira’s going to do it.”

 

Posada, who also homered in the seventh inning of Saturday’s game, was correct.

 

 


This is where Tex's homer landed 

Watching such a long and glorious home run, I had to wonder–where does Teixeira get that kind of power? Does he eat eggs, like Roger Maris did in 1961? Does he just work out every single day? Maybe he just does a lot of push-ups.

 

Or maybe, just maybe, he gets his power from God.

 

A few days ago my Uncle Tom came by for a visit at a family gathering. Being a Catholic priest (and someone I mentioned before in my blog entry about Grant Desme) he knows other priests from all over the country. Apparently one of his fellow priests from Baltimore is good friends with an umpire and his friend was able to meet Teixeira not long ago.

 

According to my uncle, Teixeira is a “good Catholic and attends mass regularly.”

 

Teixeira is a man of faith 

 

The Yankee first baseman signed about 12 or 13 baseballs for the parish in Baltimore and those autographed balls will be auctioned off. The money will go to charity and funds for the church.

 

It’s a great story. It makes me proud to know he at least thanks God for what he has.

 

I guess I should have known Teixeira was rich in his faith. After all, he attended Mount Saint Joseph High School in Maryland–the same High School my cousin Johnny currently goes to.

 

The last time I saw him, Johnny told me how Teixeira gave the school a grant to repair the baseball diamond. From what my cousin told me, the field was in bad shape. The school however used Teixeira’s money and redid the football field instead.

 

 


My cousin Johnny goes to the same high school Teixeira attended 

Kind of a raw deal, if you ask me.

 

Johnny also mentioned how his current English teacher taught Teixeira years ago, and how he wanted to try out for the baseball team. In fact, my cousin hopes to play first base at Mt. St. Joe’s, just like Teixeira. Johnny did not get around to making the team this past season, but he wants to try next year.

 

And I hope he makes it!

 

As for Teixeira, the story about his faith makes me appreciate and admire him even more. And if you are wondering, he is currently hitting .217 with 28 RBIs on the year.

 

His tape measure shot this afternoon was his seventh of 2010. I guess he can go to mass tomorrow morning and thank God for that.

Tribute to Uncle John

 

 

A Mets fan dies, goes to Heaven, and is promised a palace to live in. The palace is said to be completely and totally decked out in Mets gear; pennants, posters, and pinups all bearing the orange and blue.

 

When the man arrived to Heaven, he noticed a castle all decked out in Yankee gear. He walks up to God and asks him about it.

 

“What is the deal? I thought you promised me a Mets house!”

 

God replies, “Oh the Yankee palace? That’s my house!”

 

My Uncle John Lakis told me this joke the day of my eighth grade graduation party.

 

Sadly, my uncle passed away yesterday afternoon. He was one of the greatest Yankee fans I knew and more importantly one of the nicest people I knew. He had a kind heart, loved his family with all his heart, and had such a wonderful and infectious personality.

 

I had the pleasure of working for him over the summer of 2005. We shared many conversations about the Bronx Bombers, politics, and my future goals. He always seemed interested in what I had to say and I always enjoyed and cherished his company.

 

My Uncle John once told me a story about how he would (occasionally) go to school for half a day and leave in the afternoons to go to Yankee Stadium. He and his friends would get to the ballpark and buy cheap bleacher seats. Then they would spend the rest of the afternoon watching the Yanks win from the grand stands.

 

It’s funny that he told me that story. Just recently, my journalism mentor has been telling me to enjoy myself and not always be so cautious and tense. In his own words he told me, “get in trouble once in awhile.”

 

It’s good to know that my uncle had the mentality of having fun. I think he was trying to teach me that by sharing that story with me. Ditching school for a Yankee game is something I have done in the past year, so in a way I think he would be proud of me. 

 

I guess you have to break the rules sometimes. 

 

His son, my cousin Thomas (who is also a HUGE Yankee fan), won tickets to a Yankees vs. Braves game back in 2006. June 27 was the day of the game. Tommy had won excellent seats; in fact they were in a luxury box in the loge tier. I had never sat in a luxury box at a Yankee game (or any sporting event, for that matter) and I haven’t since.

 

 


we sat in the luxury box in 2006 

I remember talking to my Uncle John about how strange it felt to be sitting there. He remarked by saying that “it just didn’t feel like a real game,” since there were HD televisions in the suite. I’ll admit, the TVs made it feel strange, but so did the atmosphere. There were other people in the box–business men–who spoke about their business trips and work lives.

 

One of them even made a comment, mentioning how when he had gone to Chicago a few weeks prior, he saw Andy Pettitte pitch. I can only assume the White Sox were hosting the Astros in a 2005 World Series rematch.

 

As for the Yankees, it was not their night. The Braves handed them a 5-2 loss. Really the only notable highlight of the game was a home run in the ninth inning from Melky Cabrera. It’s kind of ironic when I think about it, now that he plays for the Braves.

 

 


Melky homered in the loss we saw to the Braves. Where is Melky now? On the Braves. :/ 

But we had a much better day the very next month.

 

On July 15, 2006, my other cousin Krystina gave me tickets to a game vs. the White Sox. These were excellent seats; right on the third baseline, practically right behind the White Sox’ dugout. I invited my Uncle John, Tommy, and my cousin Gordon. We all had a “boys day” and traveled down to the Bronx for the game.

 

And it was a GREAT day to be a Yankee fan!

 

We sat on the third baseline when we saw the Yanks beat Buehrle & the ChiSox

 

Mike Mussina made the start against the soon-to-be-perfect Mark Buehrle. He may have tossed a no-no the next year in 2007 and a perfecto in ’09, but the Yankees tore Buehrle apart the day we saw him pitch. They hit him very hard, chasing him from the game after just three innings of work.

 

Mussina on the other hand was brilliant tossing a quality start and later registering the win. Moose gave up just three runs on eight hits, issuing one walk and fanning five along the way. Let’s just say Mussina was Mussina that day.

 

(Of all Yankees) Bubba Crosby and Andy Phillips smacked home runs that day–if you even remember who they are. The youngsters may have gone deep, but Derek Jeter, my Uncle John’s favorite player, went 2-for-4 with three RBIs and a run scored.

 

The Yankees won in a squadoosh, 14-3. My Uncle John was very happy.

 

What I also loved about the game we all attended vs. the White Sox was the giveaway. The U.S. Postal Service issued collectible stamps of old-time baseball players. We received four stamps. The first bore the image of Mickey Mantle, the second was Mel Ott, the third Roy Campanella, and finally Hank Greenberg.

 

 


These were the stadium giveaway stamps we received.  

In fact, each player was represented at a ceremony behind home plate before first pitch. I can’t remember who represented who, but I do know that Mantle’s sons were there, which was pretty special. Now whenever I look at my stamps, I will always think of my uncle.

 

This past Christmas was the last time I saw my uncle. He pulled me aside and talked to me about possibly going to Florida this spring to see the Yankees work out in Tampa. I am about to graduate college and everyone’s schedules have been too messy, so we obviously were not able to go. He wanted to take me and his boys.

 

It was something he had wanted to do for awhile, but we never got to do it.

 

I am going to miss him very much. He was a great boss, a great teacher, an avid and intelligent Yankee fan, and overall a wonderful person. I will not forget him for everything he did for me and I will always remember the great times I had with him.

 

Uncle John, I wish you peace. We all love you and we will not forget you.

 

And I’d like to add that Heaven just received a great Yankee fan and a great man.

 

“I am the resurrection and the life, says the

Lord. Whoever believes in me, even though they

die, shall live. And whoever lives and believes

in me will never die.”–John 11:25-26

Grant Desme: A Man of God

Vocation. The word is defined as a summons or strong inclination to a particular state or course of action, especially a call into religious life. It’s also defined as work, or an occupation one is involved with.

 

Grant Desme, 23 year-old top prospect for the Oakland Athletics, has a gift. He won the Most Valuable Player of the Arizona Fall League, batting .315 with 11 homers and 27 RBIs in 27 games.

 

 
Grant Desme was ranked as the A's 8th top prospect 

 

He put up staggering numbers in the minor league regular season, batting .288 with 31 home runs, 89 RBIs, and 40 stolen bases in 2009. Desme was the only player in the minors to record at least 30 homers and 30 steals.

 

Talk about a young man with a ton of ability on the baseball diamond.

 

But Desme did not feel his true calling was baseball. Last Thursday the minor league’s best player retired from baseball. Yes, you heard right, he retired from baseball at 23 years old. Desme gave it all up for a higher power.

 

Seeking peace and aspiration for higher things in life, Desme decided to leave the game to become a Catholic priest. According to several news reports, his announcement startled A’s General Manager Billy Beane, but he was supportive and understanding of Desme’s choice.

 

But why exactly did Desme decide to become a priest? After all, it’s not a choice a person makes overnight; it has to be well-thought out.

 

 


Desme is going to study at a seminary to become a priest. 

The first two years of his minor league career, Desme was setback by shoulder and wrist injuries. He said that his days off the field gave him time to realize what’s important in his life and he got himself into Bible study during that time. News reports also confirm that he discussed the faith with his teammates.

 

Not one to distract the team during the season, Desme kept his decision to leave the game for the priesthood to himself.

 

I have to say, this is one of the nicer stories I’ve heard in the sporting world over the last week. Desme has so much God-given talent and I am proud that he recognizes that–that his talent comes from God and he is willing to thank Him for it. There are certain athletes that have no desire to truly appreciate what the good Lord has given them, much less devote a large portion of their life to the faith.

 

Desme possesses an extremely admirable quality. I know that if I were as extraordinary as him in terms of baseball, I’d never want to give that up. I would stay in the game and go on to have a lucrative career, as I’m sure that was Desme’s future.

 

But he opted not to do that; he remained in God and chose to enter the Seminary, which as I understand he will begin attending in August. The process of becoming a priest takes a lot of time; Desme said he will be a priest in 10 years.

 

 


Desme is giving his life to God 

Speaking as the nephew of a Catholic priest, I know (probably better than most people) that being a priest isn’t just about saying mass and giving out communion. There’s a lot more to it than that. Priests’ lives are a lot more difficult than baseball players’.

 

My uncle, Fr. Tom Kreiser, has been a Catholic priest for about 16 years now. In those 16 years he has had to travel the world to make pilgrimages, relocate from his assigned parish several times, and even study in Rome, Italy for four years with other priests of his order.

 

Priests lives are hard. they must travel, relocate, and spiritually advise those around them 

 

All of that on top of learning a number of different languages (including Latin and Italian), learning to hear confession, and learning how to guide and help other people when they’re in serious trouble. For example, if an elderly wife loses her husband of 50 years and is unbelievably heartbroken, it’s a priest’s job to make sure that woman is going to be safe in her faith, mind, and body.

 

I’m not exactly sure how I would handle that. I don’t think I ever could.

 

I have to tip my (Yankee) cap to Desme. I wish him the best of luck at the Seminary and maybe one day I’ll get to attend one of his masses. He will be in my prayers and I truly pray he succeeds. I am glad he found what he was looking for in his faith.

 

Jesus said to him, “If you wish to be perfect, go sell what you have and give to the poor, and you will have treasure in Heaven. Then come, follow me.”–Matthew 19:21

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