Results tagged ‘ Cy Young Award ’

Scrap Heap Heroes

He’s finished. He’s washed up. He’s through. He’s a loser. Why bother with this guy?

 

All things some current Yankees have probably heard over the past couple of years. But right now, no one is saying any of these things. Right now the Yankees are in first place in the American League East, mostly because of the players who were taken off the so-called scrap heap.

I’ll begin with the obvious: Bartolo Colon.

Bartolo started

Tonight he played the role of stopper, pitching eight strong innings en route to a 3-1 Yankee win over the Chicago White Sox, ending a two-game losing skid. Colon worked effectively, throwing 99 pitches, striking out six and only issuing one walk.

He only allowed one earned run, an RBI single in the sixth inning from Adam Dunn which plated Carlos Quentin. Other than that hiccup, Colon was masterful. He worked out of a bases loaded, no out jam in the second inning and his fastball had both life and movement, topping out on the speed gun at 96 mph.

So far Colon is 2-1 with an ERA of 2.77 and honestly, who expected this from him?

Probably not many people.

It’s still early in the season, and Colon has not logged more than 200 innings since 2005, the year he won the A.L. Cy Young Award. In 2007 he tossed 99 1/3 innings, but only registered 39 innings the following year. In 2009 he only threw 62 1/3 innings.

The question has to be asked: can his arm hold up for the rest of the year?

Time will tell. If he continues to pitch as effectively as he has this month for the rest of the season, the Yankees will not have a problem. However if the season rolls along and his velocity goes down, his pitches lose life and they fall flat, the Yankees may have to take action.

But they will cross that bridge when they get there. For now, the Colon signing is looking as if it was the right move. Bench Coach Tony Pena managed him over the winter and recommended him to the front office.

At the moment, Pena deserves a vast amount of credit.


Freddy the fifth starter? 

Another signing the Yankees made during the off-season, which right now is paying off, was the acquisition of Freddy Garcia.

Although Garcia hasn’t gotten a lot of mound time, he has made two starts and is 1-0 with a 0.69 ERA. On April 16 he beat a powerful Texas Ranger team, pitching six innings and giving up no runs on just two hits. He only walked one and struck out one, but he made a statement with that game:

“I’m for real and I can still pitch.”

On April 24 he certainly pitched good enough to win, befuddling the Orioles for six innings and not allowing a run while giving up just two hits. He walked two but fanned seven. The Chief did not pick up the win, as the combined efforts of Mariano Rivera and Joba Chamberlain weren’t enough to handle the O’s in the late innings.

The Yanks did win the game though, 6-3 in 11 innings.

 


Freddy Garcia is now under the microscopeGarcia still has a little bit to prove because he only has two starts under his belt in this early season. But both starts have been of the quality variety and he has demonstrated decent control and good command of his pitches.

Another signing paying dividend: Eric Chavez.

Some analysts called having Chavez on the bench a “luxury” being that he is a former Silver Slugger winner (2002) and a six time Gold Glover winner (2001-06). Again, he hasn’t had a lot of playing time (12 games played) but he is making it count when he does play.

So far Chavez is batting .348 (8-for-23) with two doubles, three RBIs, and four runs scored. He has also done a pretty good job playing defense, as he made a nice bare-handed play at third in yesterday’s game, playing third base for Alex Rodriguez who served as the designated hitter.

Chavez has had a series of injuries in his career and the Yankees took a chance signing him. That risk is proving to be a great reward, at least for now. Again, we are in the early stages of the 2011 season, and there is no telling what can happen in terms of injuries.

But if Chavez remains healthy, he could be looked at as a steal in the future; a brilliant acquisition and one of the better moves the Yankees have made in recent years.

Along with Chavez is Andruw Jones – a player once regarded as the most dangerous hitter in the National League. Like Chavez Jones is a former Silver Slugger (2005) and he is a 10-time Gold Glove winner and a five time All-Star.

Jones has played in eight games so far this year and is batting .316 with a home run and two RBIs. He isn’t as fast as he once was, and maybe not even as athletic. But serving the Yanks as the fourth outfielder, he has made a couple of good catches in left field.

As the year progresses, he could become more and more valuable to the Yankees. Jones hit 19 homers for the White Sox last year and knocked in 48 runs. If you ask me, that type of production from a bench player is definitely a plus, and in many ways a bonus.

The Yankee GM is looking to land Lee

Yankees’ General Manager Brian Cashman was criticized heavily by the media and the fan base for making these questionable moves in the off-season. Skeptics (including myself) thought the players taken off the scrap heap were never going to make it.

I think the only way to look at it this way:

If the GM signs the player and he bombs, the GM looks like an idiot. If he signs the player and the player prevails, the GM comes off looking like a genius.    

So far, Cashman is looking like a genius.

Yet, it cannot be stressed enough: the season is young. Very young. Through the first month each of the scrap heap signees has done extraordinarily well. They have stepped into these roles and flourished, keeping the Yankees (13-8) above the rest of the teams in the division.

But they need to keep on trucking, otherwise Cashman, as smart as he looks now, will look like a person who didn’t know what he was doing in terms of making these signings.

And for now, they are the scrap heap heroes.

     

 

The Joke’s on Washington, Sabathia, and Price

 

2010 MLB Awards. What a joke.

“What do a Momma Bear on the pill and the World Series have in common?…

No Cubs.”

I have heard some pretty funny jokes in my life. The 2010 Major League Baseball End-of-the-Year Awards, though, have probably been some of the funniest jokes I have heard over the last couple of days.

To begin with, Ron Gardenhire of the Minnesota Twins was named the American League Manager of the Year yesterday. It marked the first time Gardenhire won the award and he won it because…um…why?

I don’t have an answer. He won it because the Twins took on and defeated a weak A.L. Central? He won it for going 2-8 over the last 10 games of the season?

2010 AL Manager of the Year. Hahahahahaha!!!!!! That's a good one.

Or maybe the Twins’ skipper won the award for getting booted in the first round of the playoffs for the fifth consecutive time. Do any one of those reasons make any sense?

I thought not. In reality they gave the award to the wrong Ron.

The Texas Rangers produced the best manager in the A.L.; no questions asked. Ron Washington took his team to the World Series for the first time in their franchise history. To get there, they beat a potent Tampa Bay Rays team in the American League Division Series as well as the defending champion New York Yankees in the ALCS.

In addition to that, Washington managed Texas past the Los Angeles Angels, a team that is almost locked in every year to win the AL West. Los Angeles had won the West three straight years entering 2010, but Washington and the Rangers did not let it happen again this year.

The REAL Manager of the Year

Apparently that is not worth anything in the voters’ eyes. Instead they gave the award to the Twins’ skipper, who although is good, clearly did not deserve it. I do not wish to take anything away from Gardenhire, but Washington was the logical choice.

So the writers made a boo-boo. You wouldn’t think they would do it again in a matter of one day, right?

Wrong.                                                                                                    

Today it was announced that Felix Hernandez of the Seattle Mariners won the American League Cy Young Award.  The 24 year-old right-hander went 13-12 with a 2.27 ERA and 232 strikeouts in 2010.

13-12 and he won the Cy Young. Excuse me for a second…

(Laughs uncontrollably)

OK, I’m back.


You've got to be kidding me.  

I had every expectation that either CC Sabathia of the Yankees or David Price of the Rays would win the Cy Young this year. I understand Hernandez had a great ERA, the lowest among A.L. pitchers, in fact. But I truly feel that it comes down to which pitcher is the most valuable to their team.

After all, the award does say MOST VALUABLE PITCHER on it.

MV Pitcher. Not pitcher w/ the best ERA.

Was Hernandez valuable to the Mariners? Perhaps yes, but look at the team in question. By the All-Star break, were they even playing for anything? Does the fact that they were out of the playoff race long before the season ended mean anything to any of the voters?

I guess not, so the joke is on me.

Yet, I think it should. Sabathia and Price pitched like studs under extreme pressure in a heated pennant race down the stretch and into the final week of the season. Hernandez has never been in that type of situation–needing to win in order to keep his team alive.


The two most deserving candidates.There are many who are currently arguing that wins do not mean anything; that Hernandez did not receive a great deal of run support and his overall individual stats were far superior to the rest of the candidates.

I understand the run support argument. I get the idea regarding individual stats. But please, do not try to sell me on the idea that wins mean nothing. I am not buying it. Winning is the whole reason the game is being played, isn’t it? Why would you not consider the most important thing when making a decision on who wins the Cy Young Award?

Sabathia won 21 games. Price won 19. Hernandez won 13. And in my mind, that’s how the Cy Young Award should have played out:

Sabathia wins it. Price is the runner-up. Hernandez comes in third.

And believe it or not, the fact that I thought Sabathia should have won it has nothing to do with the fact that I am a Yankee fan. In my mind, he was just the most valuable to his team–a team that competed in a division where it was anybody’s to win. The Yankees, Rays, and Red Sox were all fighting for the AL East up until September whereas the Mariners were cooked by the middle of July.

No pressure whatsoever on Hernandez. But with every pitch up until the last day of the season, there was enormous pressure on Sabathia and Price. I’m sure both of them had the mentality of, “If I don’t pitch well, we won’t win. If we don’t win, we are not winning the division.”

There’s no telling what was running through their minds every time they took the ball.

Hernandez could have taken the ball and potentially thought to himself, “Well, if I don’t win it’s not a big deal. We are going to finish in last place anyway, so it’s not like it matters.”

There’s a huge difference in that regard in terms of mindset.

Last year, it was a little difficult for me to accept Zack Greinke winning the award. But there were a lot of variables to consider. For one, he won more than 15 games and was at least eight games above .500 (at 16-8). He also overcame anxiety-ridden circumstances, something that I know (first-hand) is difficult to deal with.

Zack Greinke overcame obstacles to get to the Cy Young.

And much like Hernandez, Greinke had the lowest ERA in the A.L.

Was Greinke on a particularly strong team? No, not at all. However his overall record and what he went through off the field to get himself back to prominence certainly means something. I would hope the writers took that into consideration when they voted for him last year.

In 2007 when Sabathia won it for Cleveland, I didn’t believe the right man won it. To this day, I still feel Josh Beckett was the best pitcher that year (and I am NOT a fan of his, so that really says something right there!) Beckett won 20 games, and as the ace of the Boston pitching staff he led the team to a championship. Again, he was the most valuable pitcher.

Should have won it in '07

Sabathia won 19 games and helped lead the Tribe to the postseason. Yet when it came down to nut-cutting time, Beckett was the man who got the job done. He was clearly more dominant than Sabathia when it mattered.

I’d really like to know why the writers voted Hernandez the winner this year. I am still mind-boggled by the whole thing. Seriously, I mean I am really stunned.

Why don’t wins matter to anyone anymore?

When did the idea of being a valuable commodity to the team become obsolete?

Why is everyone caught up in ERA, WHIP, and IP?

Why is a guy who just barely made it over .500 this year our Cy Young Award winner?

What were the writers even thinking when they made this decision?

I guess I’ll never know. What I do know is that if I ever make the Baseball Writer’s Association, I intend to consider wins and how valuable the pitcher was as the most driving aspect of the Cy Young Award. I’d certainly never give a first-place vote to a player who was one game above .500, that’s for sure.

Thief.

So on that note, congrats “King Felix.” You succeeded in winning an award that (in my eyes) you did not truly deserve. At all. Apologies to Mr. Sabathia and Mr. Price, both of whom were robbed of the Cy Young Award by a bunch of writers who don’t even think about winning, the whole reason baseball, or any game for that matter, is played.

Ron Gardenhire: 2010 A.L. Manager of the Year.

Felix Hernandez: the 2010 A.L. Cy Young Award winner.

Those aren’t award-winners. They are punch-lines.

End of the Year Awards

 

Time to hand out some awards!

As the end of the 2010 regular Major League Baseball season rapidly approaches, the Yankees once again have lived to play autumn baseball in New York. At the very least, the Bronx Bombers will go into the postseason as the American League Wild Card team. Yet they can still capture the American League Eastern Division over the Tampa Bay Rays.

At press time they are a ½ game out of first place in the AL East.

With only three games left after tonight’s 8-3 loss vs. the Toronto Blue Jays, it is once again time to hand out the Yankee Yapping End of the Year Awards. Last year I gave out various commendations to numerous Yankees who showed what being a Bronx Bomber is all about.

Since 2010 was a stark contrast to 2009, there are new awards this year to accommodate what each player has done or accomplished this past season. Without any further ado, here are the 2010 Yankee Yapping Awards!

 

Yankee Yapping Most Valuable Player

Winner: Robinson Cano

 

Most Valuable Cano

The Yankees are very lucky to have a player like Robinson Cano. This season, the slugging second baseman has put together an MVP caliber season with 28 home runs and 106 RBIs to this point. His numbers indicate a great year, but he did not win the YY MVP simply because of his offensive production.

His defense and overall character put him over the top.

In 155 games at second base this season (talk about durability!) Cano has only committed three errors. He has also helped turn 111 double plays and has secured a fielding percentage of .996.

Can you say Gold Glove?

Cano has also had the most consistent season among all Yankee hitters. Derek Jeter is currently hitting under .300, Mark Teixeira got off to a tortoise-like start, and Alex Rodriguez spent time on the disabled list. Cano did not slip under .300 this year, nor did he start off slow or get injured.

His season has all the makings of a valuable player.

Congrats Robinson!

 

Yankee Yapping’s Most Pleasant Surprise

Winner: Marcus Thames

Thames did well. I gotta hand it to him.

I’ll be the first to admit that when the Yankees let Johnny Damon go…or he let himself go…that I thought picking up Marcus Thames was a bad idea. He had already been a Yankee in 2002, although he was not what we would call a real Yankee.

Everyone knows that, in his first stint in pinstripes, Thames clubbed his first career home run in his first career at-bat off brand-name future Hall of Famer Randy Johnson. What most people don’t know is that home run was the only long ball Thames hit in his first go-round with the Yankees and he only played seven games.

2010 was his second chance and he certainly took advantage of it.

To go along with his batting average of .291, Thames has smacked 12 home runs this year and has driven in 33 runs. Two of his homers this season stand out to me.

First off, his third home run of the year, which came on July 11–only because of who he hit it off: Brian Sweeney of the Seattle Mariners.

As almost everyone knows by now, I interviewed Sweeney over the summer and he is a graduate of my College. That home run was bittersweet for me. I was happy to see Thames get around on a hanging curveball and smash a homer, but at the same time I felt bad for Sweeney.

Being such a nice guy and, without any sarcasm, the best interview I have ever conducted, I had no choice but to feel remorseful for my fellow Mercy alumnus. But Thames did a fantastic job of clubbing the ball!

The second home run that sticks out was his walk-off blast against Jonathan Papelbon and the Boston Red Sox on May 17. After A-Rod tied the game with one swing of the bat, Thames played the role of hero and swatted Papelbon to a loss.

A glorious home run to cap off a glorious victory over Boston in the Bronx.

I may have said some harsh things about him at the beginning of the year when he struggled, but he has proved me wrong. Congrats Marcus!

 

Yankee Yapping Player Who Needs to Improve for 2011

Winner: A.J. Burnett

I love you, buddy.

He had a terrible season. I know. All of Yankee Universe knows. The whole world knows.

A.J. Burnett has one more start this season (on Saturday in Boston) and will finish 2010 under .500. He is currently 10-15 with an earned run average of 5.33. In his last 10 games Burnett is 1-6 with an ERA of 6.26. Opponents are hitting .286 against him and he has allowed 107 earned runs this season.

If that doesn’t scream the words “off-year” I really don’t know what does.

Many Yankee fans are skeptical about how he will perform in the postseason and would not trust Burnett with the ball in an important game. Yankee Universe also feels he should be bumped from the number two spot in the starting rotation; some are even going as far as saying he should be put in the bullpen.

I agree. He should be bumped from the number two spot and I doubt that he will be plugged into any spot in the starting rotation, at least for the American League Division Series. If he goes to the bullpen, he might be able to carve a niche for himself, the same way Phil Hughes did last year in relief.

Although Burnett had an abysmal year, the one thing I will not do is give up on him. I understand how poorly he produced over the summer, but something many fans forget is that he began the year at 4-0 with an ERA under three. He got off to the best start of his career only to have it collapse on him; the most successful start of his life tragically morphed into the worst season he has ever had.

The other day I was asked if the Yankees would trade Burnett over the off-season because of his poor season.

The answer is easy: No. Here are three reasons Burnett is staying in pinstripes.

1)      His salary. He is owed $49.5 million over the next three years. Give me the name of a team who is going to pick up that tab? Oh, that’s right. You can’t.

 

2)       His trade value. With his lopsided numbers, who would want him?

 

3)      The Yankees’ faith in their big free agent pitchers. Anyone remember Carl Pavano? He was owed less money than Burnett, pitched worse than Burnett, and the Yankees held onto him without even trying to shop him.

 

It’s no contest. Burnett will be in pinstripes for awhile.

And while he is in pinstripes, he needs to learn how to handle himself, go out and win games. I have seen how physically capable Burnett is really is when he is pitching. He can throw 96-98 mph fastballs, something not even Mike Mussina could pull off in 2008, the year he won 20 games.

I think it’s all mental when it comes to Burnett’s struggles. Perhaps he should consult the team psychiatrist. Wait, is there a team psychiatrist?

At any rate, it’s a not a particularly good award to win, A.J. But I still have faith that you can improve, bounce back, have a solid postseason like last year and return strong in 2011.

I still believe in you, A.J. We A.J.s have to stick together through thick and thin.

 

Yankee Yapping Sayonara Award

Winners: Javier Vazquez and Nick Johnson


TERRIBLE. 

First of all, allow me to explain the nature of this award. I am handing out this award to two players who the Yankees signed, are not under contract for next season, and are most likely not coming back next year.

I had no choice but to give it Javier Vazquez and Nick Johnson.

When the Yankees decided to acquire Vazquez during the off-season, I was unbelievably confused. With a somewhat failed season in pinstripes already under his belt (2004) it shocked me that the Yanks went out and traded Melky Cabrera for Vazquez during the winter meetings.

This season just proved to me that Vazquez is not and never was suited for pinstripes. The reason the Yanks wanted him was because of how well he pitched last season, but what they did not take into consideration was that he pitched in the National League.

Vazquez made the move from the NL to the AL, and not just the AL–the AL East, where the best of the best play. And when he made that move, he traveled to a 10-10 record this year with an ERA over five.

That’s enough to say, “Thanks, but no thanks. See ya, Javy.”

Now onto Johnson…

Talk about a waste of money and time. I think his uncle, Larry Bowa, should chastise him for being such a mediocre and otherwise useless ballplayer. The Yanks signed Johnson to be an everyday designated hitter and replace Hideki Matsui in the lineup.

His numbers: 24 games played, two home runs, eight RBIs, and a .167 batting average.

…………………….

Sorry, I had to run to my bathroom and puke.

Both Vazquez and Johnson are no longer under contract for 2011. Thank God.

Congrats on the award, fellas. Have fun on another team next season!

 

Yankee Yapping Ace of the Year

Winner: CC Sabathia

Big Bad CC does it again.

When all the dust had cleared at the end of 2009, CC Sabathia had 22 wins, including the postseason. The postseason has not even begun this year and the Yankees’ number one man has 21 wins. With that, he became the first Yankee to win 21 games in the regular season since Andy Pettitte, who accomplished the feat in 1996.

 If the regular season is any indication of how Sabathia will perform in October, the Yankees will be in excellent shape every time he toes the rubber. Just as Burnett has had the worst season of his career, Sabathia has statistically had the best season he has ever had.

Needless to say, he is a shoe in for the Cy Young Award. CC might very well be “Cy Cy.”

Sabathia logged 237 2/3 innings this year, coupled with 197 strikeouts. He made 34 starts, tossed two complete games, and opponents only hit .239 against him.

If all goes right for him again, he could capture another postseason MVP award, as he was the American League Championship Series MVP in 2009. Either way, I have no doubt that Sabathia will have more hardware in his trophy case very soon.

Until then he is the Yankee Yapping Ace of the Year. Congrats CC!

*Note: CC has won this award for the second year in a row!

 

Yankee Yapping Best Trade Deadline Pickup

Winner: Kerry Wood


Wood was a great pickup.   

When the trade deadline neared the end, the Yankees picked up three notable players: Lance Berkman, Austin Kearns, and Kerry Wood. Without a doubt, Wood has made the best impact of all three players.

Wood was the Cleveland Indians’ closer and the Yankees needed to add a reliever to aid their scuffling bullpen. Suffice it to say, they added the right man. Wood has posted a low ERA in pinstripes and has really become a solid arm in relief.

Throughout his career, Wood has taken a lot of criticism because of his injuries; I am sure the Yankees knew about that when they traded for him. However, he was a former National League Rookie of the Year (1998, with the Chicago Cubs) and certainly possessed the capability to change the atmosphere of the bullpen.

It’s almost as if when Wood arrived, things started to turn around for them.

I remember his first outing as a Yankee against the Tampa Bay Rays. When Wood tossed that knee-buckling breaking ball and caught Evan Longoria looking like a deer in headlights, I knew right then and there he would fit in right away.

And he has.

Looking at his last 10 appearances alone is proof of that: 10 innings, no runs, four hits, five walks, 12 strikeouts, and an ERA of 0.00. He has flourished in his role as a late-inning relief pitcher and if he keeps it moving, he will be a wonderful asset when the playoffs begin.

Congrats Kerry!

 

Yankee Yapping Reliever of the Year

Winner: David Robertson

David Robertson battled back & earned it.

I know what everyone is thinking: how in the world could I have not awarded this honor to Mariano Rivera?! I would just like to say that The Great Rivera is his own “Walking Award,” so-to-speak. Rivera won it last year and he followed that up with another Mo-like season.

32 saves and a puny 1.32 ERA. Typical Mo.

But I am giving it to David Robertson simply because of how far he has come this year. At the outset of the season, Robertson could not get anyone out. He was placed in easy-going situations and lost control of everything.

Case-in-point: Opening Day vs. the Los Angeles Angels.

Robertson came into the game in a situation where there was absolutely no pressure; the Yankees were ahead 7-1 in the top of the ninth inning and he allowed that pressure get to him. He wound up surrendering a grand slam to Bobby Abreu and he nearly gave up the game because of it.

Yet, what struck me was what he said the day after it happened. I remember reading in the news the next day that he grabbed his glove before the game and had two words:

“New day.”

That’s precisely the attitude that won him this award. Well, that and his 67 strikeouts in 59 2/3 innings pitched this season. He never gave up, battled back from defeat, and is a solid and trustworthy arm out of the bullpen.

He deserves the honor. Congrats David!

 

Yankee Yapping Warrior Award

Winner: Mark Teixeira

Tex is a warrior.

As I mentioned before, Mark Teixeira began the season awfully slow. He was singled out on ESPN and every other sports media outlet about how he was not producing along with being criticized for his low batting average and meager power numbers.

But by around June it all changed and the sleeping giant woke up.

The power-hitting first baseman flipped the “on switch” and quickly became the dangerous hitter he has always been. Teixeira will finish 2010 with over 30 home runs and 100 RBIs for his second straight year in pinstripes.

He has 33 home runs and 107 RBIs at press time.

The reason he is regarded as a warrior is because he has been playing for a number of days, possibly even weeks, with a broken toe. Despite a relatively painful injury, he managed to keep himself in the lineup and at first base every day.  

Obviously playing in pain, Teixeira maintained his season and never let it affect him; Paul O’Neill, revered as the consummate “Yankee Warrior,” would certainly be proud of him.

Congrats Tex!

 

Yankee Yapping Grand Slam Champion

Winner: Alex Rodriguez

Grand Slam Man: A-Rod.

Whip out the mustard and rye: it’s grand salami!

Not once. Not twice. But three times this season Alex Rodriguez has delivered with the bases loaded. The former three-time AL MVP clobbered three grand slams this season, which accounts for 3/10 of the Yankees’ grand slams this year.

In fact, the Yankees tied their single season record for grand slams, originally set in 1987–Don Mattingly led the Yanks that year with six grannies out of their 10.

On May 14, Rodriguez visited granny for the first time this season. Minnesota Twins reliever intentionally walked Teixeira to pitch to Rodriguez–a strategy that never seems to pay off, according to the numbers. The Yankee third baseman responded by crushing a go-ahead grand slam over the left field wall to give the Yanks a 7-4 edge.

They went on to win 8-4.

On May 31, merely 17 days after the slam vs. the Twins, A-Rod stepped up to the plate against the Indians. With a full count, Rodriguez smashed a bomb into Monument Park, a glorious grand slam home run to give the Yanks a 6-1 lead over the Tribe.

Once again the Bombers cruised to a victory, 11-2 over Cleveland.

Rodriguez struck one last slam on July 6 in Oakland vs. the Athletics. A-Rod helped slam the Yanks to a 6-1 win. He came up in the top of the third and blasted a grand slam off Trevor Cahill, driving in four out of the Yankees’ five runs that inning.

In addition to his slam, Rodriguez later came up in the sixth and hit a solo homer, as he knocked in five of the Yanks’ six runs by himself.

A-Rod’s excellence and ability to come through when the bases are loaded earned him this award. Hopefully he can continue to rake when the postseason starts.

Congrats Alex!

 

Well that does it for this year. Either way it goes, the Yankees have an opportunity to repeat as World Champs. While whether they win it all or not remains to be seen, it’s clear these standout players made a difference in New York this season.

Congrats to all the Yankee Yapping Award winners and to all of the Yankees.

We’ll see you in October. Good luck!

Is 600 Really All That Tainted?


SMH. 

 

  

Seriously?

 

I would expect this from maybe a Boston newspaper but the Daily News? I’m a little shocked they went this far. Normally the New York Daily News is known for being very “pro-Yankee,” at least in my view, but they printed this on their back page on Wednesday, the day Alex Rodriguez crushed his 600th career home run.

 

A New York newspaper, instead of looking past all of the steroid drama, took down one its own players. I thought we had gotten past all this nonsense, but apparently not.

 

Up until this point, I haven’t been particularly vocal about my stance on steroids and performance enhancing drugs in the sport of baseball. Since the Daily News fired this little salvo and reopened Pandora’s Box, I figured this would be the perfect opportunity for me to offer my opinion on the use of PEDs/steroids in baseball.

 

First of all, I in NO WAY condone the use of any kind of illegal drug or steroid. In my life I have never tried drugs and I don’t plan on ever using drugs. I took a health class in high school and fully understand how harmful drugs and steroids can be and how they can steer a life in the wrong direction.

 

If you call writing a drug, it’s what I’m addicted to.

 

 


Hugs, not drugs. 

As far as steroids are concerned, I think no player/athlete should ever use them. Just like any other drug, there are consequences that come with using them, and they project adverse effects on the body. From what I have learned about them, they increase muscle mass, strength, and stamina.

 

That sounds great but…

 

Steroids also shrink private parts, cause jaundice, baldness, tumors, and heart failure.

 

They are like an evil super-villain, who starts off as your friend and then gradually turns on you; that’s probably the best way to describe them. They seem like they are going to help you and all of the sudden they rip your body from the inside out. Overall, it’s not a good idea to use them and there’s a good reason they are banned from basically every sport in this country.

 

 


The Mitchell Report named 89 players who took steroids 

On Dec. 13, 2007, the Mitchell Report was released, naming 89 Major League Baseball players who used steroids and/or performance enhancing drugs at least once in their careers. To first clarify how the report was formed, George Mitchell, a former U.S. Senator, conducted a 21-month investigation into the use of steroids and human growth hormones in baseball.

 

Among the more known players named in the Mitchell Report were Roger Clemens, Andy Pettitte, Jason Giambi, and Barry Bonds.

 

All of these players have had outstanding careers in baseball. Clemens has won seven Cy Young Awards and Pettitte is a five-time World Champion. Giambi is a former Home Run Derby Champion and Bonds is the all-time Home Run King.

 

They all have done great things…and it’s all thanks to steroids, right?

 

I refuse to believe it.

 

Clemens, Pettitte, Giambi, and Bonds have all at some point in their career taken steroids–which is their own fault and their own poor decision-making. They were all exposed by Mitchell, but so were a large number of other players–players who have taken steroids and done practically nothing with their careers.

 

Consider former Yankee reliever Jason Grimsley. He was named in the Mitchell Report and was reported to have purchased HGH and diet pills from Kirk Radomski, a known illegal steroid distributor. According to the Mitchell Report, Grimsley used steroids from 2000-2005 and spent over $35,000 on drugs.

 

Now take a look at his career numbers while using steroids:

 

Grimsley was 42-58 in roughly 17 major league seasons. His ERA ended at 4.77 and he struck out 622 batters all-time.

 

Jason Grimsley did 'roids...and it did nothing for him. 

 

Can you really compare that to Pettitte, or even Clemens for that matter?

 

Although Pettitte and Clemens were using steroids, their numbers were way above where Grimsley’s were. I truly feel that their numbers were better simply because they were better; they had more talent than Grimsley whether they used steroids or not.

 

Steroids probably help a pitcher more than a hitter in terms of strength and stamina, but going back to Rodriguez…

 

How much did the steroids help him? Is there a statistic that tells us how much better steroids made A-Rod? Did using them make him 50% stronger or 75% faster? Did steroids make him 25% more likely to hit a ball out of the park?

 

Did Rodriguez’s use of PEDs really enhance his performance?

 

 


Did steroids help A-Rod all that much? 

As of this moment, there’s no way of knowing. In Rodriguez’s case, the only way to (maybe) determine if steroids really helped him is to look at his numbers when he was allegedly using them, which was 2001-2003–his three year stint with the Texas Rangers.

 

2001: 52 Home Runs, 135 RBIs, and a .318 batting average.

 

2002: 57 Home Runs, 142 RBIs, and a .300 batting average.

 

2003: 47 Home Runs, 118 RBIs, and a .298 batting average. (Won the MVP)

 

Obviously he had stellar numbers during his steroid-using years, but he had stellar numbers without steroids as well. Consider A-Rod’s numbers post-steroids.

 

2004: 36 Home Runs, 106 RBIs, and a .286 batting average. This year, although he was off the juice, was his first year playing in New York. I don’t credit his discontinuation of steroids for his dip in stats. I credit getting acclimated in the big city for his decline in power numbers–they went back up the following year.

 

2005: 48 Home Runs, 130 RBIs, and a .321 batting average. (Won the MVP)

 

2006: 35 Home Runs, 121 RBIs, and a .280 batting average.

 

2007: 54 Home Runs, 156 RBIs, and a .314 batting average (Won MVP)

 

2008: 35 Home Runs, 135 RBIs, and a .302 batting average.

 

2009: 30 Home Runs, 100 RBIs, and a .286 batting average.

 

Even Rodriguez’s numbers after his stoppage of using steroids have been relatively consistent. Not counting 2010, he still averaged nearly 40 homers and almost 125 RBIs per year post-steroid usage. In laymen’s terms, he was still an amazing hitter after he stopped using drugs.

 

In fact, he was a standout hitter before he began using steroids, too.

 

At 18 years old, Rodriguez made his MLB debut with the Seattle Mariners. He played 65 games in his first two seasons from 1994-95. He only hit five homers in those 65 games and knocked in a total of 21 runs. In his first full season (1996) at 20 years of age Rodriguez smacked 36 homers, drove in 123 runs, and batted a mind-blowing .358.

 

Bottom line: he was good before taking steroids, he was good while he took steroids, and good after he stopped taking steroids.

 

Now consider F.P. Santangelo, an outfielder who played for four MLB teams from 1995-2001. Santangelo was named in the Mitchell Report and he, like Grimsley, received HGH from Radomski. His career numbers:

 

21 Home Runs, 162 RBIs, and a .245 career batting average.

 

F.P. Santangelo used steroids...who's he? 

 

There is just no comparison. Rodriguez and Santangelo both used steroids and who had the better career? Of course the answer is A-Rod, but Santangelo used steroids, right? So he should have crushed at least 400 home runs in his six-year career, right? Steroids make every player a home run hitter, right?

 

Wrong. I just can’t believe it.    

 

Along with differences in statistics, another good reason I feel steroids can’t help a hitter is hand-eye coordination. If you take the skinniest, wimpiest, most uncoordinated person on the planet and put him on the most high-powered super steroids, will he be able to hit a baseball 450 feet?

 

I really doubt it.

 

There are so many factors that go into being a great baseball player. In the baseball world, they are called “tools.” The tools are:

 

1) Hitting for average,

 

2) Hitting for power

 

3) Base-running skill/speed

 

4) Throwing ability

 

5) Fielding ability

 

It can't make a five tool player 

 

Now, can steroids completely make up a five-tool player? If they can, someone please explain to me how exactly it’s possible. Coordination and mental preparation are just as important as the physical aspect of the game of baseball.

 

I understand that steroids can increase physical attributes of the body, but I don’t feel they can artificially construct a five-tool player. Many players like Santangelo, who were named in the Mitchell Report, possessed maybe two or three of these tools. Rodriguez, who admitted steroid use in February of 2009, has all the tools.

 

Players can take all the steroids they want, but it can’t give them all the tools.

 

 

 

 

89646421_jpg_24740_0_crop_340x234.jpg

 

There just isn’t any way to tell how much better steroids make a player. Until a statistic is released that gives a number or percentage that reveals how much better steroids make a player, I just can’t believe they do anything to boost a baseball player in terms of their regular skills.

 

You can compare any ballplayer who has taken steroids, and their numbers are inconsistent. Whether you compare Clemens to Grimsley or Rodriguez to Santangelo, no one (with proven fact) can say steroids make a baseball player better.

 

I understand that they increase physical parts of an athlete’s body, meaning that their stamina and strength are better off. But ‘roids cannot help with hand-eye coordination or any other mental aspect of the game.

 

Nothing has been proven in terms of consistent baseball numbers and steroids, but what has been proven is that they are harmful–to the career, the public image, and the body. They taint records, at least in everyone’s eyes, because steroid users are regarded as cheaters.

 

Do I feel A-Rod is a cheater? Well if he is, then there’s hundreds and hundreds of other cheaters out there with him. They do not suffer the same fate as Rodriguez because most of them are now forgotten. Rodriguez only suffers because he is still in the spotlight and in the middle of everything that is Major League Baseball.       

 

However what has been proven is that medically, steroids can and will harm the body. All the athletes, professionally and going as far down as the high school level, will one day regret using drugs as a means to becoming a better athlete.

 

Sure, it may take awhile; they may regret it when they are in a wheelchair or lying in their casket, but they will one day look back and say, “I should have thought better of it.”

 

I’m sure Grimsley and Santangelo–who never did make it huge–are regretting it right now.

 

When it comes to steroids, the best thing to do is stay away. If you take them your image will be tainted, your body will betray you, and you might not even become a better athlete anyway.

So Much to Say!

There has been so much going on lately!

 

Instead of writing a whole bunch of different blog entries, I decided to write a little different this time–just for this time, since there are so many topics I want to cover.

 

First things first…

 

 


Godspeed, Shepp. You will truly be missed!! 

  • We lost a legend today. Bob Sheppard, at the age of 99, passed away. I put this

loss up there with losing Mickey Mantle and Joe DiMaggio in 1995 and 1999, respectively.

 

Sheppard was the voice of Yankee Stadium for over 50 years and life will just not be the same without him; it hasn’t been, ever since he stopped announcing games at Yankee Stadium in 2007. He officially retired back in November.

 

Mr. Sheppard, you will ALWAYS be remembered as a classy, dignified, and honorable man. They say true legends will live forever, and you will certainly live forever in the minds of the Yankee fans.

 

“I have one style of speaking. It’s the same, whether it be at Yankee Stadium, at home, in the classroom, or when I lector at Mass.“–Bob Sheppard.

 

 

 

  • I have been especially busy this week at my job with the Hudson Valley Renegades. After a walk-off win on Friday night, we were beaten on Saturday night at the hands of the Auburn Doubledays.

 

Although we lost, there was a little ceremony before the game that really made me think. At Dutchess Stadium, there is a Scout’s Hall of Fame; a place dedicated to honor important people who helped recruit players.

 

Scout Hall of Fame induction 

 

Last night the Renegades honored Bob Miske, a scout who worked for the Yankees and the Los Angeles Dodgers, among other organizations. He told a cool story about Tommy Lasorda for his induction speech, and how he became friends with him.

 

Yet before he spoke, an excellent point was brought up: why is there no Scout’s Wing to the National Baseball Hall of Fame? Of course all the legendary players and great writers are enshrined in Cooperstown, but where is the recognition for the people who pick out the young players who go on to become larger-than-life superstars?

 

It’s a great point. When you think about it, someone picked Derek Jeter and Alex Rodriguez out of a ton of other players. From there, they went on to become who they are today. Shouldn’t the person who discovered them get some credit?

 

I think they should.

 

The baseball scouts also dedicate their lives to the business. They travel around the country going to high school and college baseball games with nothing but a book, a pen, and a radar gun, looking for the next top player. Since they dedicate such a big part of their lives to the game, they should certainly be recognized for it.

 

Congratulations to Miske on being honored by the Renegades. We appreciate your effort.

 

Also on a side note, Renegades’ manager Jared Sandberg (who I recently found out is Hall of Famer Ryne Sandberg’s nephew) was standing right next to me during the ceremony…I snapped a picture of him via my camera phone very discreetly before it ended.

 

Jared Sandberg was standing right next to me during the ceremony! haha. 

 

 

  • How nice has CC Sabathia been? His victory over the Seattle Mariners today marked his eighth win in as many opportunities.

 

The Yankee ace has a total of 12 wins this season and only three losses. He is traditionally known as a “second half player,” meaning he usually puts up his best work in the second half of the season after the All-Star break. It’s pretty scary to think how many wins he could potentially reach if he keeps winning the way he is.

 

 


CC Sabathia has been AWESOME this year 

I’m not necessarily saying he’ll win another 12 games over the second half of the year and reach a mind-numbing 24 wins, but 20-21 wins is certainly looking possible at press time. As far as the Cy Young Award goes, it could be him. David Price certainly has a little bit of an edge halfway through the season, but as I said if Sabathia keeps going the way he is, he’s a definite candidate.

 

It’s great to have an ace/horse like him on our side. If his good friend Cliff Lee had become a Yankee (as it looked like he was going to be on Friday) it would have been VERY scary; to have two number one pitchers like Lee and Sabathia on the same team is frightening. To have them on the same team that already has the best record in baseball, is just plain terrifying.

 

But of course the Lee deal fell through and he went to the Texas Rangers. But wait until next year. The Rangers are never going to be able to pay him after this year and it’s quite possible Lee will be in pinstripes in 2011.

 

As for Sabathia, it’s just business as usual. He is slated to pitch again on Friday vs. Tampa Bay at home. If he wins that game, it’s pretty much a given that he’ll at least reach 20 wins this season.

 

 

  • In the fifth inning of today’s game Marcus Thames crushed his third homer of the year, a long shot high off the foul pole in Seattle.

 

It was kind of a bittersweet home run for me.

 

Brian Sweeney and I graduated from the same college! 

 

Thames hit that home run off Brian Sweeney, a fellow alumnus of my alma mater Mercy College and a journeyman pitcher from Yonkers, N.Y. I recently had the chance to talk to Sweeney, and he agreed to do an interview with me for the blog. (He is such a nice guy, by the way!)

 

Sweeney also pitched on Thursday night; he got Jorge Posada to bounce into a double play and got through the eighth inning without giving up an earned run. I’ll admit I was rooting for him. I wanted him to get the Yankees out. After he surrendered the homer to Thames today, he got Jeter, Mark Teixeira, Nick Swisher, and Rodriguez out.

 

He gave up two runs in the fifth but went 1-2-3 in the sixth. I was proud.

 

To me, Sweeney serves as an inspiration. He has made me realize that graduates of my college CAN really go on to do great things. I sometimes have very little faith in myself, especially now considering I’m a recent college graduate struggling to find a real job (I like working for the Renegades, but it’s an internship; it’s going to be over by the end of the summer).

 

But I look at Sweeney, pitching for a Major League Baseball team. He came from the same place I did and has reached a great place in life. It gives me hope and encouragement and makes me believe that I can do something great with myself, if I work hard enough.

 

Mercy alumn can go on to do great things..hope I fall into that category. 

 

When I heard John Flaherty mention Mercy College on the YES Network this afternoon and on Thursday night, it made me smile; it made me very proud. It also made me wonder if Flaherty would mention when he visited Mercy last year; I interviewed him and wrote a feature article about him when he came, as I was the sports editor of the school paper.

 

It was, by far, my favorite story that I wrote in college.

 

I’m actually still trying to get in touch with Flaherty; I’d like to send him the story I wrote on him. Unfortunately, I can’t find a way to get in touch with him at the moment. I’ll keep trying though and eventually I’ll get a hold of him. I’d like for him to see all the nice things I wrote about him.

 

As for Sweeney: I am proud of him, and I’m sure the rest of the Mercy College community is, too. I’ll be talking to him soon and when I get my interview with him, it’ll be posted here right away!

 

 

Lastly, I’d like to thank my good friend Micheal Robinson for coming up with a new picture for the Yankee Yapping Facebook page. He is a wonderfully skilled person when it comes to graphic design and he is a genius with photo-shop.

 

Yankee Yapping new logo 

 

It looks great, buddy. I love it and thank you once again!

Yankees vs. Red Sox: Thoughts and Notes

The New York Yankees cruised into a 10-3 victory over the Boston Red Sox tonight.

 

It was a wild game filled with a lot of news and stories. Here is what I made of it all…

 

Josh Beckett

 

 


Josh Beckett got rocked, but hurt some Yankees tonight 

It is kind of strange what happened to the Boston ace in this game.

 

Beckett started off strong, fanning five of the first six batters he faced. He seemed to be rolling along, looking untouchable up until the sixth inning. But everything came unglued for him and things got out of hand.

 

In the top of the sixth inning, Beckett gave up six runs on four hits, faced 11 Yankees, and was run from the game. He ended the night with 5 1/3 innings, giving up nine earned runs on nine hits. He walked three batters, hit two, and struck out eight.

 

Aside from the number of strikeouts, his line tonight was horrendous.

 

 


Robinson Cano was hit on the knee 

In the sixth inning, Beckett put Robinson Cano out. Throwing a blazing fastball, Cano was hit on the inset of his left knee. Being the fighter that he is, Cano tried to stay in the game and walked down to first. He later decided better of it and came out of the game.

 

In the same inning, Derek Jeter was hit with a pitch and Beckett also came up and in on Nick Swisher and Francisco Cervelli. It’s obvious his control was a non-factor at that point, but it may have been more than that.

 

I have never seen Beckett in that form. Usually he has pinpoint accuracy and can locate with each of his pitches. I am not going to accuse him of intentionally hitting Cano (and I can’t say he beaned Jeter on purpose, because the bases were loaded) but I will say he looked like he did not care. To me, he came off as very arrogant, even in defeat.

 

Maybe it’s just me, but I feel he acted like a sore loser.

 

At that point in the game, the Yankees were hitting him hard; he intentionally walked Brett Gardner to load the bases and face Cervelli, a move that backfired. After that happened, I think he gave up on the game and did not care anymore.

 

At one point in the inning, Alex Rodriguez mouthed “Enough is enough already,” directed at Beckett’s control issues. The Yankees were taking notice of his command problem and were not happy. They even got up on the top step of their dugout and just looked ready to pounce.

 

I wish they had. They could have hit Beckett and let him know how it feels.

 

After his outing tonight, Beckett now owns an earned run average of 7.46 and his season record is 1-1. By far, this is Beckett at his worst. He has been one of the most paramount and dominant pitchers over the last seven years and he has never been this bad.

 

I don’t mind that he was hit hard by the Yankees. I am however holding contempt for the fact that he plunked Jeter and put Cano out.

 

 

Nick Swisher

 

 


Nick Swisher is on fire! 

 Right now Nick Swisher is en fuego.

 

The cool dude in a loose mood belted his sixth homer of the year in the top of the fourth off Beckett. For Swisher, it was his second home run in as many games and his fourth in six games.

 

Beckett just hung a breaking too high and Swisher crushed it.

 

This year the Yankee right fielder looks a lot better in terms of his swing and his defense. He doesn’t look so stiff out there, and part of that I chalk up to experience. He got his first year as a Yankee out of the way, and now he is rolling.

 

And with so many Yanks injured, it’s good to have him stepping up and hitting.

 

During the post game interview with the YES Network, Swisher mentioned that he visited a hospital this afternoon. He dedicated his home run to the child he met with today, which I thought was a class act. But that’s Swisher’s personality; I’m not surprised he said that.

 

His words reminded me of Brett Gardner last year. On May 15 of last season, Gardner visited a hospital and promised a girl he would try and hit a home run. He wound up getting an inside-the-park round-tripper.

 

As for Swisher, right now he is hitting .286 coupled with 20 RBIs and 16 runs scored.

 

Keep it up, Swisher!

 

 

Phil Hughes

 

 


Phil Hughes got his fourth win of the year and first career win vs. Boston 

He is really becoming “one of our guys,” if you will.

 

Tonight, Phil Hughes matched Beckett pitch-for-pitch and went on to beat Boston and earn his fourth win of 2010. The 23 year-old righty tossed seven masterful innings, and gave up two earned runs on seven hits. He walked one hitter and struck out seven.

 

Hughes’s stuff was electric tonight. His breaking ball was working beautifully and his fastball was live and exploding through the strike zone. He went right after Boston’s best hitters and got them out one by one.

 

In the top of the third, Hughes caught Marco Scutaro looking on probably the nastiest curveball I have ever seen. The ball started up at Scutaro’s eyes, it seemed, and landed belt-high for a strikeout.

 

That breaking ball was so gross, it buckled Scutaro’s knees.

 

At the end of the night, Hughes is now 4-0 on the year, becoming the fourth Yankee starter to have four wins on the season. His earned run average went up a little bit, going from 1.44 to 1.69, but his work tonight speaks for itself.

 

Tonight also marked Hughes’s first career win over the Red Sox.

 

The Yankees have to be feeling very good about Hughes right now. Looking forward, he has a chance to win a lot of games this year. If he continues to work as effectively as he did tonight, he can make a Cy Young Award push.

 

At this point, Hughes is the best pitcher in the American League, if you ask me.

 

Back during spring training, I never thought I would be saying that! Hughes has done a fine job of clearing the air and making the statement that he belongs in the Yankee rotation.

 

Hughes is our guy. That about says it all.

 

 

Other Notes:

 

–Nick Johnson left the game with an apparent wrist injury. He was sent back to New York for an MRI and obviously won’t be playing for the rest of the weekend.

 

It never ceases to amaze me. Johnson had the best game he’s played all year on Wednesday. Two days later, he kills it.

 

Why did we get him again?

 

–Joe Girardi said a roster move will be made to replace Johnson. After the game tonight he mentioned the possibility of calling up an infielder from the minors.

 

–Every Yankee except Johnson, Cano, Ramiro Pena, and Gardner knocked in at least one run tonight.   

 

–“I’d be surprised if Cano plays tomorrow,” Girardi said. Cano took that bean ball on the knee pretty hard, and even he said he would have to assess how he is feeling tomorrow.

 

I hope he plays. He is one of the Yankees’ hottest hitters and they need him. But if he has to miss a day, I say he should take it. It’s just frustrating, because he was hit with a pitch. If he hadn’t gotten hit, he would be fine.

 

–Jorge Posada, still nursing that balky calf, didn’t play tonight. He is still day-to-day, so hopefully he plays tomorrow.

 

There is only so much catching Francisco Cervelli can do…although he is doing just fine. He went 2-for-3 tonight with an RBI, a walk, and a run scored. He is kind of flying under the radar, but quietly putting together a great year!

 

–Retaliation tomorrow afternoon? Perhaps. Perhaps not. We will have to wait and see. The Red Sox certainly deserve to know what it feels like to have one of their top guys plunked.

 

God forbid Kevin Youkilis get beaned, though. For the amount of times he has been thrown at by Yankee pitching in his career, I wouldn’t be surprised if he charged the mound. It’s alright; CC would just have to sit on him, and the Yanks would win the fight.

 

–As announced before the game, Andy Pettitte will miss his next scheduled start against the Tigers on Tuesday. Javier Vazquez will make the start Tuesday and Sergio Mitre will start Monday.

 

Girardi set this up so that Vazquez will pitch the first game against the Mets at Citi Field on Friday, May 21. It might be a good idea, considering he probably has a better shot at winning against a National League team.

 

–Tomorrow afternoon it is CC Sabathia (4-1, 2.74 ERA) vs. Clay Buchholz (3-2, 2.97 ERA)

 

–The Yankees are now 3-1 vs. Boston this season and are 20-8 overall. A stark contrast to last year when they began 0-8 in their first eight games against the Red Sox.

 

–The Yanks snapped Boston’s four-game win streak tonight and extended their win streak to five games.

Zack Greinke Wins the Cy Young

 

Cy Young

 

Zack Greinke of the Kansas City Royals won the American League Cy Young Award today, as voted by the Baseball Writer’s Association. He finished with 25 first-place votes.

 

Good for you, Zack. You had a great year on a terrible team.

 

I have to hand it to Greinke, though. He has had some abysmal years and with the Royals almost guaranteed to finish in the basement of the American League Central Division every year, it’s good to see that they can at least have something to cheer for and be proud of.

 

 


Zack Greinke is the 2009 AL Cy Young Award winner. 

I’d also like to point out that Greinke overcame a social anxiety disorder which kept him away from baseball for two months in 2006. Having been routed back to the minor leagues, he worked his way back to the majors after returning from his ailment.

 

And I have to say, I know what it feels like; as a person myself who has suffered from anxiety disorder, I know what Greinke has been through. It is not fun; it really hurts when you are diagnosed with it, I know I was. I definitely sympathize with him on overcoming his disorder. You get the jitters, your nerves are going out of whack, and you cannot concentrate.

 

Anxiety disorders are horrible, I’m just glad Greinke overcame his (and if you’re wondering, I overcame mine, as well; I attribute it to my parents’ divorce, but still, it was uncomfortable)

 

In 2007 Greinke was basically hurting in the bullpen. He didn’t have a great year, only posting a 7-7 record with a 3.69 ERA in 52 appearances.

 

Coming back to the rotation in 2008, Greinke went 13-10 with a 3.47 ERA. Not bad, at least he posted a winning record.

 

I actually saw him pitch in ’08 at old Yankee Stadium; it was June 8, the day after Johnny Damon basically single-handedly beat the Royals. It was also one of the last times I visited the old ballpark in the Bronx and it was Joba Chamberlain’s second career start.

 

Greinke was not impressive at all that day, tossing only five innings and giving up four earned runs on six hits. He walked four and struck out six.

 

I vividly remember that scorching, Sunday afternoon; Bobby Abreu murdered a long homer off Greinke in the first inning, a shot that landed in the upper deck in right field (did I mention I still love Abreu?)

 

Jason Giambi also took Greinke deep that day, blasting a home run in the sixth. The Yankees obviously won the game 6-3, and it was Greinke’s fourth loss in ’08.  

 

So the one time I did see Greinke…yeah, the Yankees smacked him up.

 

When I saw him, Greinke was not impressive 

 

But this year he was excellent. Greinke posted a record of 16-8 and led the American League in ERA with 2.16. And if he had gotten some help, he could have reached 20 wins, no doubt about it. If he was on a team like the Yankees or Red Sox or Angels and had received a little more run support–20 wins, hands-down.

 

He was 6-1 with a 1.75 ERA in his last 11 starts of ’09 and he threw one-hitters in back-to-back outings in August. He only allowed five stolen bases all year.

 

Now that is outstanding. It’s plain to see Greinke was in control this past year.

 

The Zack-man was awesome this year. The real question now is, can he do it again in 2010? We’ll have to wait and see, but I’m not sure I’m convinced he’ll be as good next year as he was this year; I mean I like Greinke, but was he just a flash in the pan?

 

Will Greinke be the same in 2010...? 

 

There is no denying he earned the award this year; clearly the best man won. But I’m not so sure Greinke will have the same type of year next year. His numbers don’t lie; he has had some awful, forgettable seasons in past years.

 

This year could have just been an isolated incident.

 

The runners-up were Felix Hernandez (2nd) Justin Verlander (3rd) and CC Sabathia (4th) and they have all posted stellar numbers year after year. There has been a pattern with the other guys–they have put up the same types of numbers for a few years now.

 

With Greinke, it was one year. The rest of his career has been horrid. But we’ll see. We won’t know until 2010. But what we do know is that he had an exceptional, Cy Young-worthy 2009 and he deserved to win it.

 

Greinke is truly a feel-good story. And I am happy for him.   

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 27 other followers