May 2014

Eli Manning Talks Guiding Eyes, Derek Jeter’s Influence

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For the third time in my career today I was given the chance to catch up with Eli Manning. Just thought I’d throw my story up here on the blog. I asked him about the game he and Peyton attended the other day and he gave me some great thoughts on Derek Jeter.

Here’s some video and the story from the evening:

 

 

WHITE PLAINS – Throwing a game-winning pass in the fourth quarter of the Super Bowl with time winding down is nothing New York Giants’ quarterback Eli Manning is unfamiliar with, having accomplished the feat twice.

Being a Super Bowl hero may mean a lot to the veteran QB. Yet being a participant in Guiding Eyes for the Blind’s annual Golf Classic at the Mt. Kisco Country Club might just mean a little bit more to him. This evening Manning announced at Mulino’s of Westchester in White Plains that he would be hosting the event for the eighth straight year at the spring tee off event.

Guiding Eyes, a Yorktown-based nonprofit guide dog school, is thrilled to welcome Manning back into the fold – and Manning couldn’t be happier to be back, as his interest keeps on growing over time.

“Each year there’s different stories about the impact it has on people’s lives,” he said. “They’re not just helping someone’s life, they’re changing it and it’s such a great program. They (Guiding Eyes) are now helping out people with autism, and it’s really an honor to be associated with a great program like Guiding Eyes.”

On June 9 Manning will put on a blindfold before the golf game begins, and he’ll try to sink a putt on the practice green. Last year Manning missed the shot from 10 feet away, although two years ago he hit it from 14 feet out. The golf classic will feature 14 blind golfers from around the country, competing for the Corcoran Cup – the prize for the winner.

“I think it’s all luck,” Manning said of the blind putt demonstration. “I don’t think it’s more challenging, I think it stays just as difficult every time. I can assure you I’m not getting any better at it, but it gives you a great appreciation for all the golfers who are playing in the tournament and playing blind. It’s a great feat to watch, to play golf without sight.”

Manning also talked about the goings-on of the Giants’ offseason, including his ankle surgery, which he said went fine. In fact, the surgery affected his preparation for the upcoming golf classic but added he’s been concentrating on getting back to football form.

“The last week I’ve been out on the field, passing,” he said “I’ve been doing all the routes and all the drops I can do, but I feel no issues. The injury kept me off the golf course; my main focus is getting back healthy and learning the offense.”

Manning took in some down time at a Yankee game last Sunday with his older brother Peyton, though he didn’t get a chance to wish retiring Yankee captain Derek Jeter well. However he plans on attending a game before the baseball season ends to say a proper goodbye to Jeter, who gave him a lot of career advice over the years.

“I didn’t see him – Peyton went early and saw batting practice and did the whole deal,” Manning said. “I figure I might see Derek down the road, but it was Peyton’s last chance. Derek’s been great to me over the years; been a really great role model for me.

“Even at this stage in my life I still have role models and Derek ‘s been someone that you look up to, and you see how he conducts himself, how he handles being in the spotlight, how he plays the game, and he’s been a great example for me to follow.”

Manning was in Nashville, Tenn. When the Giants selected wide receiver Odell Beckham, Jr. (LSU) in the first round of this past week’s NFL draft, and he’s excited to be playing with someone he’s familiar with. Beckham attended the Manning family’s football camp while in high school, giving the Giants a decided edge being that the QB and WR know each other.

“The more skilled players and good players you can add to the team, the better,” Manning said. “Odell has always been a professional. The first time I worked ever out with him I think he was a junior in high school, and he was a different athlete from the guys that were there. He stood out and it’s been fun to watch him grow as a player. I’ve been impressed.

“Now with a new energized offense, we can come in and get refocused on playing better football.”

A Howl for Wolff

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On a day where it looked as if Masahiro Tanaka’s undefeated win streak dating back to his days last year in Japan was coming to an end, everything came together for the Yankees and the streak was kept alive. The combination of a Mark Teixeira home run, more clutch hitting from Jacoby Ellsbury, a go-ahead homer off the bat of Kelly Johnson, and a late game scoring barrage gave the Yankees a 9-3 win over the Tampa Bay Rays.

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No, Tanaka didn’t get “Brock Lesnar’d” today, if you will; his streak remains intact as he’s a perfect 4-0 this season – today being a prime example of how, even when things aren’t exactly going his way, he still wins. The young man from Japan battled through the first four innings or so, letting up homers to Desmond Jennings and Wil Myers, until he settled down and finished up like a stud.

Today’s win not only kept Tanaka’s unblemished record breathing, it also snapped a 3-game Yankee losing skid, and put the Bombers back in first place in the AL East after being a half game out to Baltimore following a brutal 10-5, 14 inning loss to TB Friday night.

In the heart of the losing schnide, though, the Yankees honored a man who broke a record – but not a record that could be smashed on the ball field.

Bob Wolff, famed broadcaster who called Don Larsen’s perfect game in the 1956 World Series among countless other big time sporting events, broke the record for longest career as a broadcaster. The Guinness Book of World Records gave him the nod, as he’s been calling games from behind the mic for the better part of 74 and a half years.

At 93 Wolff is still at it, working for News 12 Long Island.

Bob Wolff, Joe Girardi

In this writer’s opinion, it couldn’t have happened to a better person.

I had the opportunity to interview Wolff’s son Rick in 2009. Rick was the baseball coach at my college (Mercy, NY) from 1978-85, and a minor league ballplayer turned author and radio personality. Rick talked a lot about his dad’s work and what type of man he is in the interview I conducted, saying,

“My dad was a well-respected broadcaster. He called Don Larsen’s perfect game in the World Series in 1956, and was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1995.

“My dad has always been my biggest fan. He is still active and calling baseball games, and he always stood by me. I remember when I coached at Mercy, he used to come watch the team play. He spent a lot of windy afternoons on the Hudson watching my team.” (His team being the Flyers, now known to the Mercy College student body as the Mavericks).

It took awhile, but I was actually able to dig up the hard copy of that article I wrote on Rick.

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I also have to credit Rick for the inception of this blog; he was the individual who suggested I start Yankee Yapping.

After the Yankees lost 4-2 to Robinson Cano and the Seattle Mariners Thursday night, Wolff spoke to the press at Yankee Stadium, and without really giving away the secret of his success, mentioned that he – when calling a game – always tried to make it interesting. Instead of bombarding everyone to death with stats constantly, he threw in quips and witticisms to keep the audience engaged. Important to do, in a profession that requires so much attention from so many different people.

Using that method set Wolff apart from the pack.

Since everything sports-related in terms of information is basically relayed through Twitter in this day and age of social media, I suppose it’s important to maintain the attention of your audience – your followers – through funny puns, in between the giving of scores and statistics.

I try to be that way, while being as professional as possible. Of course, the whole job of a sports journalist is to provide information on what happened (or is happening) in a game, along with any extra info and analysis. Yet, as Wolff stated, it’s important to keep it fun.

Because after all, aren’t sports supposed to be fun to watch?

 

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