November 2011

My Newest Bundle of (Yankee) Joy

Editor’s note: I wrote this mainly for my sister Dina, who recently gave birth to her son, my nephew, Ryan James Martelli.

I never believed in love at first sight until Monday morning. It really does exist.

Back in March when my older sister Dina informed me she was pregnant, I flipped out – and that’s a generous understatement. My sister is 26 years old (certainly old enough to have a baby) but she isn’t married and I don’t know the baby’s father all that well. It shocked me and made me feel uneasy, awkward, and even angry.

My parents brought my sisters and me up with morals and values. I feel she went against that.

Over the summer she found out she was having a baby boy. I was happy for her, yet at the same time I maintained that uneasiness and anger over her situation. Instead of feeling good about the idea of a new baby, I found myself feeling confused and overcome with a bizarre emotion.

I suppose I just couldn’t get used to the idea of my sister being a mom.

On Thanksgiving morning she gave birth to Ryan James Martelli. He weighed a little over eight pounds and was born at exactly 4:57 a.m.

Obviously on turkey day my entire family’s attention shifted to him. My mom was already at the hospital and my dad skipped out of my aunt’s Thanksgiving meal to go meet his new grandson. A number of my other family members also paid Dina and Ryan a visit on Thanksgiving and the days that followed.

 I, on the other hand, stayed for turkey on Thanksgiving and wasn’t able to meet my nephew at the hospital.

The high school hockey season began over the weekend, and to put it mildly, covering games on the ice ate a lot of my time following the holiday. I think Dina may have taken it personally – me not visiting her and her son in the hospital, that is.

When I woke up Monday morning there was a text message waiting in my cell phone inbox from my sister. She asked if I was ever going to see the baby. By then she was home from the hospital with the baby, so I grabbed my Yankee rally monkey and walked across the hall to her room.

I walked in and there he was, lying in his bassinet. A smile just lit up my face.

The second I laid eyes on the little man, I knew I loved him. Dina let me hold him, and my eyes welled up; I just couldn’t contain my emotion for this baby. After holding him for a few minutes my sister took him back – and as soon as I let go of him, he began to cry.

Dina recognized that he was hungry. While she was preparing to feed him – and he was wailing – I presented the Yankee monkey to him. He immediately stopped crying once he saw the monkey and after I let out a chuckle, I shot my sister a glance and said,

“Would you look at that? He’s already a Yankee fan!”

It’s difficult to explain, but as soon as I laid eyes upon my nephew and held him in my arms, everything changed. All the bad feelings and the things that bothered me about her pregnancy disappeared and I suddenly realized so many different things.

I came to the realization that I have the opportunity to make a strong and positive impact in this child’s life. Perhaps I can teach him all about the game of baseball – and encourage him to pursue playing the sport throughout his growing years.

Maybe by introducing baseball to him, he will fall in love with it (and the Yankees) just like his uncle.

Not only did I realize all those things, but in those moments that I held him, I reflected on all the things his mother – my sister – has done for me throughout my life. In keeping with the baseball theme, in particular I thought about June 20, 2010.

Dina bought tickets for the Yankee game that day for me as a birthday present, although the day of the game fell five days after my actual birthday on June 15. She and I went to Yankee Stadium and had a wonderful time.

The Yankees hosted the Mets in a Subway Series finale and we had the pleasure of seeing a 4-0 Bombers win over their cross-town rivals. The only offense was a grand slam off the bat of Mark Teixeira while a brilliant starting pitching performance from CC Sabathia held the Mets in check.

It was such a thoughtful gift and she went out of her way to give me a meaningful birthday present. I’ll never forget that.

To Dina, I would like to say congratulations. I know I may have been critical and not the easiest person to be around while you were pregnant, but I would like to apologize if I may have driven you crazy.

I love you, my sister. And I love your son, my nephew. He looks to have a lot of potential in this world, and I know he will live up to it all. If you ask me, I think he could even be captain of the New York Yankees some day.

And when he is, I can look down at him from the press box, and he can look up at me from the field, just like the final scene in “The Sandlot.” Before we give each other the thumbs up…

“Safe! Safe! Safe! I don’t believe it! Ryan stole home! Ryan Stole home!”

A Little Help

Hello folks!

This isn’t going to be a formal Yankee Yapping entry or anything, I just wanted to ask all you readers for a small favor.

I recently purchased a Flip cam and with it started my own Facebook show entitled, “A.J.’s Hour of Inside Jokes and Obscure References.”

Yeah. I know.

Basically I created it just because I could use some laughs these days – and what better way to get some laughs than by laughing at myself?!

I start every episode with my token line, “Lickety split, don’t have a fit.” If you’re a fan of the TV show “Smallville” you might get the reference – and that’s basically the show; I just rant on about random things and happenings, as well as movie and TV show quotes.

Some episodes feature me driving in my car, talking and cracking jokes. Other ‘sodes feature some of my friends who have been asking me for “guest spots” on the show ever since I started it a few months back. (And if you want a guest spot on the show, just message me I’ll try and make it happen!)

Another point I should make, just so you don’t get your hopes up: no episode ever runs a full hour. It’s sort of part of the joke. They only go an average of 8-10 minutes.

But anyway, here’s where I need you guys: I created a Facebook page for it, and I have just 10 likes (as opposed to the over 800 likes I have on the Yankee Yapping Facebook page). If it wouldn’t be so much trouble, could you just take three seconds of your time, go to the Facebook page and click “like” for me?

Even if you have no intention of actually watching the show, please just click “like” for me and make me feel good. I know it’s a cheesy and otherwise lame call to arms, but I could use every little bit of help I can get.

It’s not as if I am trying to get noticed or anything – believe me, I’m just doing the show for laughs and for fun. But if you happen to click “like” and think my jokes are funny, then I’ll most likely feel happy. :)

I’ll leave you with an episode of my show, just to give you a taste for what it’s about. Please enjoy it, and please, give it a Facebook “like.”

Nova Not AL ROY, Finishes Fourth

Today Major League Baseball announced the American and National League Rookie of the Year Award winners. Atlanta Braves’ closer Craig Kimbrel captured the N.L. award, winning unanimously with all 32 first-place votes.

The A.L. ROY went to starting pitcher Jeremy Hellickson of the Tampa Bay Rays, as he received 17 first-place votes. Mark Trumbo of the Los Angeles Angels came in second place and Eric Hosmer of the Kansas City Royals finished third.

Ivan Nova, who most Yankee fans expected to be the first Rookie of the Year since Derek Jeter in 1996, finished in fourth place with just one first-place vote.

Cue the anger and confusion among the pinstripe faithful.

Truthfully, any one of the top four A.L. ROY finishers could have taken home the accolade. Hellickson, Trumbo, Hosmer and Nova each had seasons worthy of the award.

Since the last two A.L. Rookie of the Year awards have gone to pitchers (Andrew Bailey of the Oakland Athletics in 2009 and Neftali Feliz of the Texas Rangers in 2010) I had the feeling either Hellickson or Nova would win this year – keeping the trend of pitchers winning the A.L. ROY.

Naturally I felt Trumbo (left field, first base) and Hosmer (first base) weren’t going to win – although each of them put up outstanding offensive numbers for rookies. Trumbo clubbed 29 homers and knocked in 87 runs, despite sporting a .254 batting average. Meanwhile Hosmer smacked 19 home runs and drove in 78 runs, nearly hitting .300 with a BA of .293.

But as expected, the pitching trend kept up.

Hellickson made 29 starts for the Rays and went 13-10 with a 2.95 ERA and 117 strikeouts in 189 innings pitched. His won-loss record may not have been indicative of an overpowering season. Yet serving as a middle-of-the-rotation pitcher, Hellickson helped the Rays in a major way – especially considering they had traded away Matt Garza, a hurler the Rays thought to be a front-line starter, at the beginning of the year.

Nova struggled a little bit at the beginning of the season. He got shelled and lost some tough games in the early-going, but found a way to persevere and endure, grinding his way to a 16-4 record in 28 starts. He finished with an ERA of 3.70 and notched 98 strikeouts in 165.1 innings pitched.

Looking at overall individual stats – minus the record – Hellickson did have a numerically stronger year. Plus, that brief period when Nova was sent down to the minors in July probably hurt his chances at the ROY.

Yet, look at Nova and how he evolved throughout the course of the season; how he was slated to be a number four starter and was basically forced to become a number two when Phil Hughes and A.J. Burnett faltered.

Nova was forced to “carry the ball” so-to-speak, and he carried it very well.

Last week About.com published an article revealing who should win each end-of-the-year award, who the dark horses were, and who they thought would win. Not only did this article say Nova should win – but it said he would win.

“Who should win Rookie of the Year: Ivan Nova of the New York Yankees.  

The 24-year-old Dominican righty finished 16-4, and did it while filling a gaping hole in the rotation of one of the best teams in the league. His ERA is just a so-so 3.70, but has a 2.7 WAR, which is solid in a relatively weak crop of rookies, at least statistically this season.

Who will win Rookie of the Year: Nova. Being in the big market will put him over the top.”

The author of that article seemed to have a lot of faith in the Yankee rookie – and not that I pay that much attention to WAR, or wins above replacement, but it was a good point – one I didn’t even take into consideration.

Those who vote for the end-of-the-year awards, AKA the baseball writers, clearly recognized Nova for his effort and what he brought to the Yankees – but in a lot of the fans’ minds, they did not recognize it enough because he didn’t finish first.

Lately the Yankee fans seemingly have a lot to be upset about when it comes to these awards after every season. Last year many felt CC Sabathia – who won 21 games – was robbed of the A.L. Cy Young when Felix Hernandez, who only won 13 games, captured the award over the Yankee ace.

What’s more, Robinson Cano was a front-runner to take home the A.L. Most Valuable Player Award in 2010, but he came in third to Josh Hamilton (the winner) and Miguel Cabrera (first runner-up). I know of more than one Yankee fan who truly felt Cano was, in a word, “shafted.”

The last Yankee to collect a meaningful end-of -the-year accolade: Alex Rodriguez, when he won the A.L. Most Valuable Player Award in 2007. To get there, A-Rod had to crush 54 homers, bat .314, and drive in 156 runs.

It’s a little obvious by now the writers who vote for the awards aren’t exactly Yankee lovers, and the media has apparently become somewhat “anti-pinstripe.” Cano and Curtis Granderson are two Yankees that can easily be considered for this year’s A.L. MVP, which will be announced a week from today on Nov. 21.

Now that Nova did not win Rookie of the Year, I don’t expect either Yankee to win the award.

Sabathia is up again for the Cy Young with his 19 wins this season and 3.00 ERA – but forget it. Everyone already knows Justin Verlander (24-5, 2.40 ERA) of the Detroit Tigers is taking home that piece of hardware.

The Yankees may have run out of luck this year when it came to the awards. Like it or not, the media is not on the Yanks’ side and ultimately they choose who goes home with the trophies.

If I ever make the Baseball Writer’s Association I promise to be fair and unbiased, as all writers should be. If I were voting this year, I probably would have given Nova a first-place vote, simply because he was valuable to the Yankees – and you can’t argue that. Just look at the points made in the About.com article.

Just know that if I ever get to the BBWA, there will be at least one writer who doesn’t hate the Yankees on the voting panel – although I would maintain my professional integrity as a reporter and consider every candidate respectfully.

As a Yankee fan though, I can only hope next year Jesus Montero breaks out and has the year of his life. If he can get his game up and have a “coming out party” of sorts in 2012, he can avenge this rather unfair treatment of Nova in this year’s A.L. Rookie of the Year voting – at least unfair in the minds of the majority of the Yankee fans.

On second thought, if I did have a vote this year, I would have voted for this guy

Just kidding, just kidding.

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